Unfulfilled Promises..

The previous posts on the recruitment and utilization of Teaching Assistants brings us to highlight the unfulfilled promises that have been made globally to ensure that all children have their right to (quality) education safeguarded.

The right to education for minority communities and groups is the theme of the first United Nations Forum on Minority Issues which took place in Geneva on December 15-16 -2008.

The Forum, “Minorities and the Right to Education”, aims to provide an annual platform for dialogue and cooperation on issues pertaining to people of national, ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities.

Worldwide, minority children continue to suffer disproportionately from unequal access to quality education which perpetuates the cycle of poverty leaving them unable to later fulfil their potential in employment and society. The international frameworks on equal access to quality education for minorities was discussed during the  first forum.

The Forum, which was organized by the UN Independent Expert on Minority Issues, Professor Gay McDougall, and the OHCHR, in collaboration with UNESCO, was attended by a number of experts and human rights activists and prepared a Recommendation to go before the Human Rights Council.

Unesco organised a thematic debate as a side event on “Overcoming Inequalities in Education: the Importance of Inclusion.”

Read Report from the Thematic Debate on “Overcoming Inequalities in Education: the Importance of Inclusion”

http://www.unesco.org/education/UNForumminorities_oidelreport.pdf

For more information contact: K.Singh@unesco.org

“[…] I have personally committed myself to making it a priority, for education is a fundamental human right, set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Human Rights Covenants, which have force of international law. To pursue the aim of education for all is therefore an obligation for States.”
(Koïchiro Matsuura, Director General of UNESCO, “Education for All: the Unfulfilled Promise”, 21st Century Talks session on education for all).

UNESCO survey finds under-privileged children also disadvantaged in the classroom

30-05-2008 – A new study by UNESCO’s Institute for Statistics (UIS) highlights the strong effect of social inequality on primary education systems in many countries and the challenge to provide all children with equal learning opportunities.

Entitled ‘ A view inside primary schools’, the report presents the results of a unique survey undertaken in 11 countries in Latin America, Asia and North Africa.

 

Right to education
Right to education

0-12-2007 – This publication is a joint UNESCO and UNICEF framework for the realization of children’s right to education and rights within education.

The result of intensive collaboration between UNESCO and UNICEF, the publication brings together the current thinking and practice on human rights-based approach in the education sector.

It presents key issues and challenges in rights-based approaches and provides a framework for policy and programme development from the level of the school up to the national and international levels.

For more information contact: rve@unesco.org

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2 Replies to “Unfulfilled Promises..”

  1. To add to this interesting note, may I add that the small island nation of Mauritius lives to the goals of EFA. English and French being the official languages in addition to a third language on a compulsory basis. In this case, the ethnic belonging of the student helps in the choice. Hence, Mandarin, Urdu, Hindi, Gujrati, Marathi, Telegu, Tamil, Spanish are tought as a mandated 3rd language from Primary to secondary schools. This leaves a Mauritain student after the A levels the choice to study in various countries and has today become as asset to the service oriented economy of the island.

  2. To be multilingual in this world certainly gives you a few more stepping stones and early bilingual development can support the development of neural networks. This topic demands much more research.

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