Educating ‘the Whole Child’ – new resources

Child friendly schooling has been gaining acceptance over the last 20 years with UNICEF and Save the Children being the prime movers.

Now ASCD has promoted the ‘whole child’ approach to education with new resources and a campaign flavour.

Leading a Whole Child Approach to Education

We often see people who we think are natural-born leaders. While this may be true for a very small group of people, most leaders need support and resources to develop their skills. Yet we too often expect school leaders to automatically have all the answers to our schools’ problems. Leading a school using a whole child approach to education requires principals to be visionary; effective instructional leaders; active learners; and influencers within their staff and the community. How can we develop principals to lead a whole child approach to teaching, learning, and community engagement?

» Join us as we change the conversation about principal leadership development throughout May. Start by taking advantage of several new opportunities to explore a whole child approach to leadership, and visit www.wholechildeducation.org throughout the month for additional resources, blog posts, and videos.

May’s Whole Child Podcast: Developing Principals to Lead a Whole Child School

Download the Whole Child Podcast to hear an engaging conversation with Thomas Hatch, associate professor at Teachers College, Columbia University and codirector of the National Center for Restructuring Education, Schools, and Teaching; Ann Cunningham-Morris, director of professional development at ASCD; and Patricia Reynolds, principal of Intermediate School 73—The Frank Sansivieri Intermediate School in Maspeth, N.Y.

Free E-Book: Keeping the Whole Child Healthy and Safe

Download ASCD’s newest e-book for free through May 17. This fourth in a four-book series of e-books on educating the whole child features articles from Educational Leadership and other ASCD publications that focus on safe and healthy schools, promoting healthy lifestyles, protecting students, addressing bullying, teaching good values, and helping students cope with life changes.

New Report: Learning, Teaching, and Leading in Healthy School Communities

This report summarizes key findings from the ASCD Healthy School Communities pilot study that was conducted from 2006 to 2008. The evaluation found that the role of the principal is the most critical factor in implementing meaningful school change and school improvement.Read the full report.

New Video Series: Supporting the Whole Child Through Partnerships for Healthier Schools

This video series shows best practices and examples of how to implement ASCD’s Healthy School Report Card and lead a whole child approach to education. The series features five videos about Healthy School Communities pilot sites from urban, suburban, and rural schools in the United States and Canada that are improving the health and well-being of their students, staff, and communities. Watch the video series, and learn more about becoming a healthy school community.

Some other research results and resources from the Whole Child website

DOING WHAT WORKS: DROPOUT PREVENTION

U.S. Department of Education, 2009. (web resource)

The U.S. Department of Education provides information on recommended research-based practices educators can use to prevent dropouts. Multimedia content and school success stories make the site a fun and valuable destination.

FAMILY ENGAGEMENT IN EDUCATION: SEVEN PRINCIPLES FOR SUCCESS

National Resource Center on Charter School Finance and Governance, 2009. (PDF, 60 pgs.)

Research shows the best predictor of urban family involvement at the K-8 level is what the school does to promote this involvement. Knowing what to do will help educators be more effective in promoting family engagement.

HELPING IMMIGRANT AND REFUGEE STUDENTS SUCCEED: IT’S NOT JUST WHAT HAPPENS IN THE CLASSROOM

Center for Health and Care in Schools, 2009. (PDF, 8 pgs.)

Problematic behaviors exhibited by students have a direct impact on student success and the importance of engaging families for student academic achievement has been well documented. The challenges are more pronounced among immigrant and refugee students and their families. This research highlights a number of successful strategies used to engage immigrant and refugee families in support of their children’s mental health.

LOCAL WELLNESS POLICIES: ASSESSING SCHOOL DISTRICT STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING CHILDREN’S HEALTH

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2009. (PDF, 102 pgs.)

While most students nationwide are enrolled in a school district with a wellness policy on the books, these policies are weak, failing to provide our children with the healthy foods and physical activity they need to learn and grow, according to a new report released today by Bridging the Gap and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

RESEARCH REVIEW: SCHOOL-BASED HEALTH INTERVENTIONS AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Washington State Board of Health, 2009. (PDF, 33 pgs.)

This report provides important new evidence that links student health and academic performance. It identifies proven health interventions and practical resources that can positively affect both student health and academic achievement.

IMPACT OF COMMUNITY AND YOUTH ORGANIZING ON PUBLIC SCHOOL REFORM

Annenberg Institute for School Reform, n.d. (Web resource.)

This study looks at organizing efforts by residents of seven urban communities across the country to improve their public schools. It aims to document the organizing campaigns and measure the impact on three critical indictors of education reform: district-level policy, school-level capacity, and student outcomes.

REALIZING THE PROMISE OF PROMISE NEIGHBORHOODS

The Bridgespan Group, 2009. (PDF, 22 pgs.)

The U.S. Department of Education is preparing to issue RFPs for planning grants to create Promise Neighborhoods in 20 of the country’s poorest communities. This paper discusses the lessons learned from earlier models and how policymakers and community leaders can benefit from this opportunity to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty.

A LOOK AT COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Center for American Progress, 2009. (PDF, 28 pgs.)

This report provides an overview of community school strategies in the United States and how community schools can decrease poverty’s detrimental effect on students. Using examples of community school initiatives, it highlights where research shows community schools have had the most success. It also reviews England’s extended school model and suggest how the United States can expand community schools based on England’s experience.

THE 4-H STUDY OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT

Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University, 2009. (Web resource and PDF, 34 pgs.)

This research report shows that youth development programs like 4-H play a special and vital role in the lives of America’s young people. Among the findings, eighth graders who participated in 4-H programs at least twice per month also scored higher on civic identity and engagement measures and had a greater ability to express opinions on community issues.

GRADUATING AMERICA: MEETING THE CHALLENGE OF LOW GRADUATION-RATE HIGH SCHOOLS

Jobs for the Future and the Everyone Graduates Center, 2009. (PDF, 52 pgs.)

The federal government has a once-in-a-generation opportunity to stimulate significant progress in solving the nation’s graduation crisis. While high schools with low graduation rates exist in every state and many communities across the country, they are concentrated in a subset of 17 states that produce approximately 70 percent of the nation’s dropouts. Data from these states are used to develop new analytic tools for examining the characteristics of schools, districts, and states that make certain approaches more likely to succeed in certain places.

ACHIEVING GRADUATION FOR ALL: A GOVERNOR’S GUIDE TO DROPOUT PREVENTION AND RECOVERY

National Governor’s Association, 2009. (PDF, 48 pgs.)

This report shares reform strategies that build a comprehensive approach to dropout prevention and recovery. Lowering dropout rates statewide expands opportunities for youth to be successful in college, career, and life; strengthens communities and civic engagement; and helps achieve economic growth.

PARTNERS IN PREVENTION: THE ROLE OF SCHOOL-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS IN DROPOUT PREVENTION (EXECUTIVE SUMMARY)

National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE), 2009. (PDF, 7 pgs.)

In a study of the current dropout crisis, a NASBE study group shares how school-community partnerships can work as a critical strategy within a systemic, comprehensive model to combat the crisis. The report contains state and local examples of effective programs and policies that support school-community partnerships and dropout prevention, as well as guiding questions and numerous resources for policymakers as they grapple with these issues.

A DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVE ON COLLEGE AND WORKFORCE READINESS

Child Trends, 2008. (PDF, 49 pgs.)

A report providing the developmental perspective on what competencies young people need to be ready for college, the workplace, and the transition to adulthood. It also provides perspective of the research in three fields: youth development, college readiness, and workforce readiness, and the need for competencies at each level.

21ST CENTURY SKILLS, EDUCATION, AND COMPETITIVENESS: A RESOURCE AND POLICY GUIDE

Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2008. (PDF, 20 pgs.)

This guide summarizes the challenges and opportunities that, if left unaddressed, will curtail our competitiveness and diminish our standing in the world. We can thrive in this century only with informed leadership and concerted action that prepares Americans to compete.

SUCCESS IN THE MIDDLE: A POLICYMAKER’S GUIDE TO ACHIEVING QUALITY MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION

National Middle School Association (NMSA), 2006. (PDF, 44 pgs.)

NMSA describes the 14 characteristics of successful middle schools, and argues that government policy has a profound impact on educators’ ability to be successful.

Tools

MOVE IT! AND REDUCE YOUR RISK OF DIABETES SCHOOL KIT

National Diabetes Education Program American Indian Work Group, 2006. (PDF, 24 pgs.)

Encourage physical activity in the school setting to help reduce risk for diabetes among youth using fact sheets, customizable posters and newsletter items, resources, and activity ideas.

DOING WHAT WORKS: DROPOUT PREVENTION

U.S. Department of Education, 2009. (web resource)

The U.S. Department of Education provides information on recommended research-based practices educators can use to prevent dropouts. Multimedia content and school success stories make the site a fun and valuable destination.

WORKING TOGETHER: SCHOOL-FAMILY-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

Center for the Education and Study of Diverse Populations at New Mexico Highlands University, 2009. (web resource)

This tool is designed to provide educators and families with information, resources and strategies to both increase and strengthen parent, family, and community involvement. Also available in Spanish.

SCHOOL HEALTH POLICY RESOURCES FROM THE CDC

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2009. (web resource)

The CDC and its funded partners provide information, tools, and resources to support school policy and program development, implementation, and evaluation.

2009 HEALTH AND WELLNESS BEST PRACTICES GUIDE FOR COLORADO SCHOOL DISTRICTS

Colorado Legacy Foundation, 2009. (web resource)

Designed for administrators, school board members, parents and community members, this online guide highlights school district level best practices for healthy schools, students and staff. A shorter version of this guide is available for download in English and Spanish.

THE COMPENDIUM OF ASSESSMENT AND RESEARCH TOOLS (CART)

(web resource)

CART is a database that provides information on instruments that measure attributes associated with youth development programs. It includes descriptions of research instruments, tools, rubrics, and guides and is intended to assist those who have an interest in studying the effectiveness of service-learning, safe and drug-free schools and communities, and other school-based youth development activities. Support for assembling this compendium of research instruments was supported by The Star Center and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Learning In Deed Initiative.

PTA NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR FAMILY-SCHOOL PARTNERSHIPS ASSESSMENT GUIDE

PTA, 2008.(PDF, 32 pgs.)

The PTA’s National Standards for Family-School Partnerships offer a framework for how families, schools, and communities should work together to support student success. This assessment guide, or rubric, helps facilitate the implementation of these standards. The guide includes specific goals for each standard, indicators for measuring these goals, and examples for each indicator to show what good practice looks like at different levels of development.

COMMUNITIES IN SCHOOLS AND THE MODEL OF INTEGRATED STUDENT SERVICES: A PROVEN SOLUTION TO AMERICA’S DROPOUT EPIDEMIC

Communities In Schools, 2008. (PDF, 8 pgs.)

This report documents the linkage between well-designed and implemented community-based programs and significant improvements in student and school performance.

PTA NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR FAMILY-SCHOOL PARTNERSHIPS

PTA, 2007. (PDF, 2 pgs.)

This short report outlines the benefits of parent, family, and community involvement and include the National PTA’s six standards for family-school partnerships. The standards reflect recent research and focus on how parents, schools, and communities can work together to support student success.

Statistics

EDUCATION AT A GLANCE 2008: OECD INDICATORS

Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), 2008. (web publication)

This report enables countries to see themselves in the light of other countries’ performance. It provides a rich, comparable, and up-to-date array of indicators on the performance of education systems and represents the consensus of professional thinking on how to measure the current state of education internationally.

THE CONDITION OF EDUCATION 2008

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2008. (PDF, 334 pgs.)

A major national report presents statistics on 43 different educational indicators.

QUALITY COUNTS 2008: TAPPING INTO TEACHING, UNLOCKING THE KEY TO STUDENT SUCCESS

Education Week with support from the Pew Center on the States, 2008. (web report)

Examine strategies that states can use to unlock the full potential of the teaching profession, find out how various states are approaching pay for performance, learn how working conditions influence teacher retention, and more in this annual 50-state report.

Guides

TEN TOP TIPS FOR TEACHING WITH NEW MEDIA

Edutopia, 2009. (PDF, 9 pgs., free registration required)

Full of succinct and practical ways to prepare students for 21st century success, this guide offers tips for making the most of the latest technologies and innovative ways to use them.

FRAMEWORK FOR 21ST CENTURY LEARNING

The Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2007. (web report)

The Framework for 21st Century Learning, a plan to help students and educators achieve 21st-century learning goals, addresses key concerns by developing a clear vision for student outcomes in the new global economy and defines how school systems can best support them.

NEW HAMPSHIRE’S VISION FOR REDESIGN: MOVING FROM HIGH SCHOOLS TO LEARNING COMMUNITIES

State of New Hampshire Department of Education, 2007. (PDF, 56 pgs.)

A report bringing together state, regional, and national resources with the work of New Hampshire educators in a plan to support the improvement of our secondary schools.

THE LEARNING COMPACT REDEFINED: A CALL TO ACTION

ASCD, 2007 (PDF, 30 pgs.)

ASCD’s Commission on the Whole Child advances five major recommendations for ensuring that all children are healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged.

THE WHOLE CHILD

ASCD Infobrief, ASCD, 2007. (web brief)

This issue reviews the objectives of ASCD’s whole child initiative, promising practices from around the world, and the immense work left to be done.

THE WHOLE CHILD MEETS NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND

Is It Good For the Kids?, ASCD, 2007 (web column)

Advocacy for the whole child is at the heart of the ASCD mission. Our position calls for comprehensive education of all children from preschool through college. This editorial discusses how the success of this endeavor depends on broad engagement of all stakeholders, including parents, communities, and policymakers at all levels.

ENGAGING THE WHOLE CHILD

Educational Leadership, ASCD, 2007. (web publication)

Which practices put the whole child at the center of the education enterprise? Learn about practices that challenge students academically, engage their interests and enthusiasm, and support them as learners and people.

ALL TOGETHER NOW: SHARING RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE WHOLE CHILD

Coalition for Community Schools for ASCD, 2006. (PDF, 23 pgs.)

This paper discusses strategies policymakers and educators can use to provide a more balanced education for students.

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