Celebrate Human Rights Day – 10th December 2011

Human Rights Day is celebrated annually across the world on 10 December.

Check this site: Celebrate Human Rights Day

The date was chosen to honor the United Nations General Assembly‘s adoption and proclamation, on 10 December 1948, of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), the first global enunciation of human rights. The formal establishment of Human Rights Day occurred at the 317th Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly on 4 December 1950, when the General Assembly declared resolution 423(V), inviting all member states and any other interested organizations to celebrate the day as they saw fit.

The day is a high point in the calendar of UN headquarters in New York City, United States, and is normally marked by both high-level political conferences and meetings and by cultural events and exhibitions dealing with human rights issues. In addition, it is traditionally on 10 December that the five-yearly United Nations Prize in the Field of Human Rights and Nobel Peace Prize are awarded. Many governmental and nongovernmental organizations active in the human rights field also schedule special events to commemorate the day, as do many civil and social-cause organisations.

Want do some something on Human Rights Day?


PLEDGE TO WRITE

Pledge to join thousands of others writing their letters as part of Write for Rights Day on 10 December. You can pledge to write a letter, come along to one of our events or hold your own with friends and family. Whatever you plan to do, we’ll send you a reminder so you don’t forget! Take the Pledge now | Find an event near you

Send a message of solidarity

Sending a card with a simple, personal greeting is a powerful way to show support for someone facing human rights abuse.

Every card matters. For prisoners of conscience, for families whose relatives have disappeared, for people in danger for defending human rights, the cards bring comfort and hope; they offer encouragement and support, and raise spirits. But they also show the authorities – prison officers and politicians – that the world is watching. Find out more and send a card.

If you are organising a letter writing event at school, with some friends or as part of a Local Group we have made all of this year’s case sheets, address labels, appeal template letters and translated messages available to download. Download resources

INEE have added their weight to Human Rights Day

Celebrating the Right to Education

INEE is grounded in the fundamental principle that education is a human right. Education promotes individual freedom and empowerment and is essential for the exercise of other human rights. To mark International Human Rights Day, we want to lift up Articles in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and in the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which provide that grounding.

Human rights do not cease during disaster or conflict; slavery and servitude are unacceptable in non-emergency and in emergency contexts alike. The right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion do not stop when a flood or earthquake occurs, nor does the right to a nationality or peaceful assembly. It is the same for education-or at least, it should be.  Millions of children and youth are, today, being denied their human right to education because they live in a conflict zone, or their community has been impacted by a natural disaster. This lack of education is unacceptable. Beyond being recognized as a fundamental human right, education must be protected and supported with strong legal frameworks, adequate resources and political support.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948

Article 26

(1) Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.

(2) Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace.

(3) Parents have a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

The Convention on the Rights of the Child, 1989

Article 28

1. States Parties recognize the right of the child to education, and with a view to achieving this right progressively and on the basis of equal opportunity, they shall, in particular:

(a) Make primary education compulsory and available free to all;

(b) Encourage the development of different forms of secondary education, including general and vocational education, make them available and accessible to every child, and take appropriate measures such as the introduction of free education and offering financial assistance in case of need;

(c) Make higher education accessible to all on the basis of capacity by every appropriate means;

(d) Make educational and vocational information and guidance available and accessible to all children;

(e) Take measures to encourage regular attendance at schools and the reduction of drop-out rates.

2. States Parties shall take all appropriate measures to ensure that school discipline is administered in a manner consistent with the child’s human dignity and in conformity with the present Convention.

3. States Parties shall promote and encourage international cooperation in matters relating to education, in particular with a view to contributing to the elimination of ignorance and illiteracy throughout the world and facilitating access to scientific and technical knowledge and modern teaching methods. In this regard, particular account shall be taken of the needs of developing countries.

Article 29

1. States Parties agree that the education of the child shall be directed to:

(a) The development of the child’s personality, talents and mental and physical abilities to their fullest potential;

(b) The development of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, and for the principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations;

(c) The development of respect for the child’s parents, his or her own cultural identity, language and values, for the national values of the country in which the child is living, the country from which he or she may originate, and for civilizations different from his or her own;

(d) The preparation of the child for responsible life in a free society, in the spirit of understanding, peace, tolerance, equality of sexes, and friendship among all peoples, ethnic, national and religious groups and persons of indigenous origin;

(e) The development of respect for the natural environment.

2. No part of the present article or article 28 shall be construed so as to interfere with the liberty of individuals and bodies to establish and direct educational institutions, subject always to the observance of the principle set forth in paragraph 1 of the present article and to the requirements that the education given in such institutions shall conform to such minimum standards as may be laid down by the State.

For more information on the right to education and on UNESCO’s work in this area see UNESCO and Education: Everyone has the Right to Education, UNESCO, 2011.

HREA would also like to celebrate HRD 2011

Human Rights Day 2011 is even memorable for those involved in human rights education. The UN General Assembly is expected to adopt the Declaration on Human Rights Education and Training on this day. This landmark document recognises the right of every one of the planet’s seven billion people to have access to human rights education, a lifelong process involving all ages, all parts of society, and every kind of education, formal and informal. The Declaration specifies not simply what one should learn about human rights, but also how (“through human rights, which includes learning and teaching in a way that respects the rights of both educators and learners”) and also why (“for human rights, which includes empowering persons to enjoy and exercise their rights and to respect and uphold the rights of others”). The adoption of this new Declaration also offers educators and policy makers an occasion to reassess state and national policies and priorities in the light of international standards.

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