Why the UK has to take some responsibility for refugees fleeing from conflict zones…

The UK government seems to be hesitant in decision making concenring the present ‘refugee’ crisis as if it should be someone else’s responsibility. It may be worth exploring the link between Britain’s involvement in arms manufacture and selling  and the results of conflict that are partly fuelled by the manufacture and trade in arms.

World’s largest arms exporters

The units in this table are so-called trend indicator values expressed in millions of U.S. dollars at 1990s prices. These values do not represent real financial flows but are a crude instrument to estimate volumes of arms transfers, regardless of the contracted prices, which can be as low as zero in the case of military aid. Ordered by descending 2014 values. The information is from theStockholm International Peace Research Institute.[12]

2014 rank Supplier Arms exports
1  United States 10194
2  Russia 5971
3  China 1978
4  France 1200
5  Germany 1110
6  United Kingdom 1083
7  Israel 1074
8  Spain 824
9  Italy 786
10  Ukraine 664
11  Netherlands 561
12  Sweden 394
13   Switzerland 350
14  Turkey 274
15  Canada 234

Perhaps we can compare the profits made by companies who are promoting conflict by producing and selling arms to the state of education in the countries that suffer from conflict:

From the world education blog

$2.3 billion needed to send all children and adolescents to school in war zones

This blog details the contents of a new paper by the Education for All Global Monitoring Report on the barriers that conflict poses to getting all children and adolescents into school, and a new suggested target for financing education in humanitarian crises.

Click to enlarge

Our new paper, released today, one week before the Oslo Summit on Education for Development, shows that 34 million children and adolescents are out of school in war zones.  The paper shows that $2.3 billion is required to place them in school – ten times the amount that education is receiving from humanitarian aid right now.

One of the core reasons conflict is taking such a heavy toll on education is lack of financing. In 2014, education received only two per cent of humanitarian aid.

The paper determines that even the suggested target of at least 4%, championed since 2011, is grossly insufficient. Had this target been met in 2013, it would have left 15.5 million children and youth without any humanitarian assistance in education. In 2013, 4% of humanitarian aid would have left over 4 million children and youth in Afghanistan, nearly 1.6 million children and youth in Syria, and almost 3 million in Sudan without humanitarian support.

It may be reasonable to levy a higher proportion of a company’s profits who benefit from conflict so as to pay for the results of such conflicts – this has been promoted in environmental circles as ‘polluter pays’.

So there should be a link between those who promote conflict by providing arms and the impact on communities, families and children in particular.

The present ‘ refugee crisis’ should be more broadly discussed rather than narrow mindedly pinpointing the refugees as being the ’cause’ of the crisis.

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