Girls’ education

During the last few years I have been working on aspects of Girls’ education in Zambia and Tanzania. We know the importance of a focus of attention on girls education for the future of any country so as to overcome discrimination and to enhance  human potential of the whole nation.

Why a focus on girls?

Two-thirds of the world’s uneducated children are girls, and two-thirds of the world’s illiterate adults are women. Around the world, girls and women continue to suffer from a lack of economic opportunity, inadequate health care and education, early marriage, sexual violence, and discrimination.

Numerous studies have demonstrated that educating women and girls is the single most effective strategy to ensure the well-being and health of children, and the long-term success of developing economies.

There are many benefits associated with girls’ education, such as:

Reduction of child and maternal mortality

Improvement of child nutrition and health

Lower birth rates

Enhancement of women’s domestic role and their political participation.

In education, a focus on the quality of education of girls ensures an improvement in the quality of education for all students.

Some new posts from the INEE newsletter:

Community-Supported Models for Girls’ Education in Diverse Contexts in Pakistan

Brookings.

Paper
This paper presents the case for promoting girls’ education in the challenging contexts of remoteness, social conservatism, fragility, and severe financial hardship by providing localized services delivered through community-supported initiatives, contextualized approaches, and flexible strategies. This argument draws from the latest literature on community-supported education, barriers to girls’ education, and the role of nongovernmental actors, as well as the author’s research on three community-supported schooling models in three different contexts in Pakistan: 1) in a state of fragility; 2) in a socially conservative area experiencing social resistance to girls’ education; and 3) in an urban slum area.

 

WASH in Schools for Girls E-Course 
UNICEF, UNGEI, Emory University, Govt. Of Canada

Publication 
The WinS4Girls E-Course was developed and delivered as part of the project ‘WASH in Schools for Girls: Advocacy and Capacity Building for MHM through WASH in Schools Programmes’ (WinS4Girls Project), which is being funded by the Government of Canada. In recognition of the positive impact on girls’ education, initiatives around the world are addressing adolescent girls’ menstrual hygiene management (MHM) needs in coordination with ongoing efforts to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities and services in schools. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization often associated with menstruation, integrating MHM into WASH in Schools (WinS) empowers all students, especially girls.

Click here to download the publication.

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