Education Infographics

Education Infographics

EFA GMR

The Education for All Global Monitoring Report (EFA GMR) team has produced dozens of new infographics to visually depict the challenges of achieving universal education. The infographics show “report cards” on the MDGs, figures on out-of-school children and youth, challenges facing learners in conflict settings, and key facts and figures about how financing gaps and opportunities.
infographics
Advertisements

Education for All -Global Monitoring Report (2014) – Teaching and Learning: Achieving Quality For All

As new brain research helps us to understand the best conditions for learning and while the demands of the future lives of the present generation are very much unknown, it is worth taking stock on the present situation of teachers and learners:

Education for All : Global Monitoring Report 2013/2014

“Teaching and learning: Achieving quality for all”

 

Launch date  29 Jan 2014.

The 2013/4 Education for All Global Monitoring Report will show why education is pivotal for development in a rapidly changing world. It will explain how investing wisely in teachers, and other reforms aimed at strengthening equitable learning, transform the long-term prospects of people and societies.

Equity and quality education will be pivotal in the post 2015 agenda. Visit our post 2015 online hub for resources and updates on ‘Education Post 2015’.

Check out:

**Global Learning Crisis Costing $129 Billion a Year
UNESCO’s 2013/14 Education for All Global Monitoring Reportreveals that a global learning crisis is costing governments $129 billion a year. Ten percent of global spending on primary education is being lost on poor quality education that is failing to ensure that children learn. This situation leaves one in four young people in poor countries unable to read a single sentence. The report concludes that good teachers are the key to improvement and calls on governments to provide the best in the profession to those who need them most.

** This year’s report, Teaching and Learning: Achieving Quality for All, warns that without attracting and adequately training enough teachers the learning crisis will last for several generations and hit the disadvantaged hardest. In many sub-Saharan African countries, for example, the Report reveals that only one in five of the poorest children reach the end of primary school having learned the basics in reading and mathematics. Read More  Download Report

The report  “Teaching and Learning: Achieving Quality for all” discusses a range of topics relevant to our task team such as investing wisely in teachers, strengthening equitable learning, and questions for longer term transformation in the face of disadvantage and social injustice.  The report makes the following core recommendations:
  1. New education goals after 2015 must include an explicit commitment to equity so that every child has an equal chance of an education. New goals need clear, measurable targets with indicators that will track the progress of the most disadvantaged.
  2. New goals after 2015 must ensure that every child is in school and learning the basics. Children do not only have the right to be in school, but also to learn while there, and to emerge with the skills they need to find secure, well-paid work.
  3. Ensure the best teachers reach the learners who need them most. National education plans must include an explicit commitment to reaching the marginalized. Teachers should be recruited locally, or have similar backgrounds to disadvantaged learners. Every teacher needs pre- and in-service training on ways to target support to disadvantaged children. Incentives must be provided to ensure the best teachers work in remote, under-served areas. Governments must work to retain their best teachers, providing pay that meets at least their basic needs, good working conditions and a career path.
A summary report in English is attached to this message as well as the press release. The full report and translations are available from the following Link.

*** 

Update from INEE, after the launch:

Please also watch and share the new video about the Report. Help join in the conversation with INEE online about these new findings via #teachlearn / @efareport.

Please go to the EFA GMR website where to download the full report and the summary in several languages. There are also new infographics highlighting key facts and figures from the Report.

 

**

Present and past reports:

REPORTS

Education For All (EFA) – 1000 days to MDG deadline and the Global Monitoring Report

The UN is reminding us that it is only 1000 days until the deadline for achieving the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs). Although human development does not progress by deadlines or is dictated by a centrally constructed calendar, it is worth taking stock on how ‘global priorities’ are being discussed and acted upon.

Education Counts

Towards the Millennium Development Goals – 2010 MDG Summit Exhibition “EDUCATION COUNTS Towards the Millennium Development Goals” was held in New York, 9 September – 20 November 2010

These info snippets can help focus attention on the value of education. The most chilling statistic is that global military spending increased by 6% since 2008 ,even with a financial crisis. Perhaps with more effective education mixed with increased emotional intelligence we would take Costa Rica’s lead in doing away with a military budget. We could then agree that the human species has truly evolved.

Infographics designed by Zago, New York

One extra year of schooling increases an individual’s earnings by up to 10%.

$16 billion a year in aid would send all children to school in low-income countries. This is about half of the amount Europeans and Americans spend on ice cream annually ($31 billion).

171 million people could be lifted out of poverty if all students in lowincome countries left school with basic reading skills – equivalent to a 12% cut in world poverty.

In Kenya, if women farmers are given the same level of education as their male partners, their yields for maize, beans and cowpeas increase by up to 22%.

In Latin America, children whose mothers have some secondary schooling remain in school for two  to three more years than children of mothers with less schooling.

A child born to a mother who can read is 50% more likely to survive past age 5.

In sub-Saharan Africa, an estimated 1.8 million children’s lives could have been saved in 2008 if their mothers had at least a secondary education.

Women with postprimary education are 5 times more likely than illiterate women to be educated on the topic of HIV and AIDS.

Worldwide military expenditure for 2009 was $1.5 trillion. Despite the financial crisis, this represents an increase of 6% in real terms compared to 2008. The increase in aid during the same period was only 0.7%

Education for All – Making the right to education part of every child’s reality. New publication

PUBLICATION: Education for All – Making the right to education part of every child’s reality
(Save the Children)  

With four years to go until the 2015 deadline to achieve universal primary education, there is a lot to celebrate. Out-of-school numbers have been dropping and progress has been made towards the Education for All goals. This brief highlights areas in need of greater attention and key recommendations to address challenges in ensuring all children are in school by 2015.

 

The full report is available here.

 

 

RESOURCE: Education for All in Asia-Pacific Newsletter (UNESCO)

From the recent INEE newsletter:

(UNESCO Bangkok)  
The Education Policy and Reform Unit has launched an EPR E-Newsletter to keep in touch and build networks with professionals in education sector. It is hoped to be a channel for knowledge and information exchange on education policy and reform among the professionals, keeping them informed of what’s happening in the field of education policy and management in the Asia and Pacific region, not only from the sector-wide perspective, but also in those critical to the crossroads of learning and life-such as secondary education as well as technical and vocational education and training.

To sign up for the newsletter and access the February 2011 issues, click here.

Education for All – JOMTIEN STATEMENT: Tenth Meeting of the High-Level Group on EFA

(UNESCO)
 

Some 40 global leaders attended the Tenth Meeting of the High-Level Group (HLG) on Education for All (EFA) from 22 to 24 March in Jomtien, Thailand. Jomtien was the site of the historical 1990 World Conference on Education where the EFA movement was launched. Two decades on, the aim of providing quality basic education for all children, youth and adults remains a major challenge.

 

Excerpt from the Statement:  7.    We can no longer turn a blind eye to the urgent need to protect education in conflict-affected and disaster-affected countries. Schools are targeted by combatants, and schoolchildren, especially girls, and female teachers, are particularly vulnerable in violent conflict situations. More effective monitoring systems in regard to human rights violations affecting education are required. Education can also play a significant part in building peace in fragile contexts when it communicates tolerance and mutual respect. We therefore appeal to the international community to support education in conflict situations and fragile contexts as an integral part of humanitarian assistance and reconstruction, and to give it far greater priority in financing requests and delivery.

Read about the meeting and download the statement here.

 

Celebrate -20th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC)- free resources

As mentioned in an earlier post the 20th November is not only Universal Children’s Day, but also the 20th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child.  The Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE) has produced a celebratory explanation of some of the articles of the CRC and also some important resources. INEE is an open global network of over 3,500 practitioners, students, teachers, staff from UN agencies, non-governmental organizations, donors, governments and universities who work together to ensure all persons the right to quality, relevant and safe educational opportunities.

From INEE:

Tomorrow, 20 November 2009, is the 20th anniversary of the Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC), which is a legally binding international instrument spelling out the principles that Member States of the United Nations agree to be universal – for all children, in all countries and cultures, at all times and without exception, simply through the fact of their being born into the human family. The four core principles of the Convention are non-discrimination; the best interests of the child; the right to life, survival and development; and respect for the views of the child.

The CRC is of particular importance to education in emergencies, because it forcefully brings together provisions relevant to emergencies and armed conflict in ways that few other international treaties do, offering added protection for the consistently most vulnerable group: the child.

The following 2 articles affirm the right of the child to education, in emergencies, as well as in times of peace and stability:

Article 28 obliges all state parties to establish educational systems and ensure equal and non-discriminatory access to them. Especially primary education must be compulsory and free to all, but also secondary, vocational and higher education must be made progressively available. Education must be provided in a way that respects the dignity of the child at all times. Lastly, Article 28 obliges States to encourage and promote international cooperation, with particular account taken of the needs of developing countries.

Article 29 defines the aims of education, chief amongst these being that education shall be directed to the development of the child’s personality, talents and mental and physical abilities to their fullest potential. This echoes the over-riding principle of the CRC, as stated in Art. 3, of the best interest of the child, requires that schools be child-friendly in the fullest sense of the term and that they be consistent in all respects with the dignity of the child. Lastly, that education must be for “the preparation of the child for responsible life in a free society, in the spirit of understanding, peace, tolerance, equality of sexes, and friendship among all peoples, ethnic, national and religious groups and persons of indigenous origin”.

These 2 articles must be read together with a few other key articles in the Convention:

Article 2  on non-discrimination of any kind, irrespective of the child’s or his or her parent’s or legal guardian’s race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national, ethnic or social origin, property, disability, birth or other status.

Article 38 on the respect for the rules of international humanitarian law in times of conflict, ensuring the continued and specific protection of children and civilians, protecting them from taking part in hostilities and entering into armed forces.

Amnesty International

Article 6 (right to life); Article 9 (separation from parents); Article 12 (Respect for the views of the child); Article 19 (Child’s right to protection from all forms of violence); Article 22 (Refugee children); Article 39 (Rehabilitation of child victims); and the 1st Optional Protocol (On the Involvement of children in armed conflict).

Timor Leste -Ray Harris

The right to education is also articulated in many other international conventions and documents, which do not limit this right to children, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948); the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees (1951); the Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966); the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006); and the non-legally binding Dakar World Education Forum Framework for Action (2000), promoting Education for All.

More free resources

The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child
http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/crc/discussion2008.htm

The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, the body of independent experts responsible for reviewing progress made by States parties in implementing the Convention on the Rights of the Child, devoted its 2008 Day of General Discussion (DGD) on to articles 28 and 29 of the Convention dealing with the right to education, focusing upon the education of children in emergency situations. The day was intended to provide States and other actors with more comprehensive guidance as to their obligations to promote and protect the right to education as outlined in articles 28 and 29. For more information about the DGD, please click here.

The Committee released its report, including recommendations, which you can find on the INEE website along with several other supporting documents about the day. Among the recommendations particularly relevant to INEE members, the Committee:

  • calls upon States parties to honor their obligation to fully ensure the right to education for every child within their jurisdiction, without any discrimination, throughout all stages of emergency situations, including the emergency preparedness phase and the reconstruction and the post emergency phases.
  • calls upon States parties, donors and relief agencies to include education as an integral component of the humanitarian relief response from the outset.
  • urges all States parties, in particular those that are prone to natural disasters or in areas likely to be affected by armed conflict, to prepare a plan of action for the provision of the right to education in emergency situations.
  • urges States parties to fulfill their obligation therein to ensure schools as zones of peace and places where intellectual curiosity and respect for universal human rights is fostered; and to ensure that schools are protected from military attacks or seizure by militants; or use as centres for recruitment. The Committee urges States parties to criminalize attacks on schools as war crimes in accordance with article 8(2)(b) (ix) of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court and to prevent and combat impunity.
  • urges States parties, United Nations agencies, donors and relief agencies to ensure that INEE Minimum Standards are applied at all stages of humanitarian relief response in order to ensure the right of children to education in emergencies.
  • recommends that States parties and other international partners support child participation so that children can voice their views with regard to what they learn (the content) and how they learn (rights-based and child-centered active learning) and are empowered by the relevant content of education and the active learning process.

The DGD, and these ensuing recommendations on education in emergencies, built upon the 2008 report of Vernor Muñoz, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Education on the right to education in emergencies. Many INEE members contributed to the contents of this report through questionnaires developed by the Special Rapporteur and disseminated on the INEE Listserv and Website. For a summary of the report, the full text for download in Spanish and English, and highlights relating specifically to INEE and the INEE Minimum Standards please click here.

Right to Education Project
http://www.right-to-education.org
The RTE site offers information and resources for States, civil society organisations and individuals on how to interpret and claim the right to education. It is centered on the basic premise that education must be available, accessible, acceptable and adaptable to all; that education systems must be accountable, participatory, transparent and non-discriminatory; and that education rights entails both the right to, in and through education.

UNICEF Website:  20th Anniversary of the CRC
http://www.unicef.org/rightsite/whatyoucando.htm
The UNICEF site includes a Take Action center that articulates what individuals can do – visa via governments, families and communities, schools and teachers, the media, the private sector, and development and humanitarian organizations — to change the Convention from words on paper into real actions for children. It also contains a section for youth, helping them to understand the CRC, know their rights and take action: http://www.unicef.org/rightsite/433.htm

INEE Minimum Standards Toolkit Thematic Guide on Human & Children’s Rights
The INEE Minimum Standards present a global framework for coordinated action to enhance the quality of educational preparedness and response, increase access to relevant learning opportunities, and ensure humanitarian accountability in providing these services. The Convention on the Rights of the Child is one of the foundational documents for the INEE Minimum Standards. The tools and resources in this guide are a selection from the INEE Minimum Standards Toolkit that relate to the cross-cutting issue of human and children’s rights. To access the Thematic Guide, please click here. All of these resources are available online and on the INEE Minimum Standards Toolkit www.ineesite.org/toolkit.

Your Right to Education: A Handbook for Refugees and Displaced Communities
The Women’s Refugee Commission created Your Right to Education: A Handbook for Refugees and Displaced Communities to raise awareness of everyone’s right to education. The handbook uses drawings that readers at all levels can understand. It is hoped that you will share Your Right to Education with children, young people and adults in your community to help them better understand the right to education, how it fits with other human rights and the benefits that education may bring. It is also hoped that Your Right to Education will serve as a tool to discuss these issues in depth and to encourage action to expand and improve education in displaced communities. Click here to download the Handbook in English, French and Arabic.

A complimentary resource is Right to Education During Displacement. A resource for organizations working with refugees and internally displaced persons (2006, Women’s Refugee Commission), which is available here.

Child Rights Information Network (CRIN)
This website and listserv offers consistently high-quality and comprehensive information on the rights of the child as defined in the CRC. It also has a selection of resources relating to education. Explore the website, and sign-up for their listserv CRINMAIL here: www.crin.org.

A Human Rights Based Approach to Education for All
(2007, UNICEF and UNESCO)
This document brings together the current thinking and practice on human rights-based approaches in the education sector. It presents key issues and challenges in rights-based approaches and provides a framework for policy and programme development from the level of the school up to the national and international levels.While the predominant focus of the document is on primary basic education and child rights within education, it is based on the EFA goals and situated within lifecycle and lifelong learning approaches. It addresses the right to education as well as rights within education, which include human rights education itself. Click here to download this resource.