How Do We Know How Many Children Are Not Learning?

INEE is a great repository for articles on all things educational – these two articles were listed in the latest newsletter

Having participated in developing GPE proposals it is still distressing to see statistics on those children who are out of school and those in school not learning enough to warrant their family’s investment and achieving  little at the end (if they stay in school that long).

How Do We Know How Many Children Are Not Learning?
Global Partnership for Education
12 June 2013 – In the 5th lesson of our EdBits series, education expert Luis Crouch explains how education economists quantify the total number of children that are in school but not learning.  The notion that there are about 250 million children
Click to read the full article

Reaching out-of-school children
UNESCO
10 June 2013 – Progress in reducing the number of children out of school has come to a virtual standstill just as international aid to basic education falls for the first time since 2002, according to a new paper released by the UNESCO
Click to read the full article

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The right of indigenous peoples to education that’s appropriate – new podcast

Podcast: The right of indigenous peoples to education that’s appropriate to their culture is recognized. But is it realized?
Rudina Vojvoda, UNICEF

The right of indigenous people to education that is appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning has been recognized and protected since the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007. Almost seven years later, to what degree is this right realized?

In this ‘Beyond School Books’ episode, podcast moderator Rachel Bonham Carter talked to Grand Chief Edward John, North American Representative to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues; Gabriele Papa, a senior high school student and secretary of the Salamanca High School Model United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues; and Krysta Williams, Advocacy and Outreach Coordinator for the Native Youth Sexual Health Network.

To listen to the podcast and view the full article, please click here.

Indigenous peoples – Radio Series on Free, Prior and Informed Consent

Cultural Survival Launches Radio Series on Free, Prior and Informed Consent

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“The most important element of Indigenous Peoples’ ability to claim the right of Free, Prior and Informed Consent is to have informed and organized communities.” –UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues Delegate

To further advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples worldwide, Cultural Survival is developing an innovative new radio series to spread the word about the right of Indigenous Peoples to Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC). We are producing and distributing a series of radio programs on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples to inform Indigenous listeners about their rights under international law.

The principles of Free, Prior and Informed Consent seek to ensure that a given community has the right to grant or withhold consent for proposed projects that might affect their lands, resources, and territories. Development projects seeking to exploit marginalized areas at low costs often do not take into account the considerations of Indigenous Peoples who have lived on and protected these lands for countless generations. FPIC’s emphasis on “prior” consent indicates that Indigenous Peoples should be involved in the early planning stages on any development project and before any decisions take place, thus bolstering the opportunity for Indigenous communities to have a voice in how the development process takes its form. The principles of FPIC are enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the International Labor Organization (ILO) Convention 169.

Listen to the programs at consent.cs.org.

Who are ‘Cultural Survival’?

Cultural Survival is a global leader in the fight to protect Indigenous lands, languages, and cultures around the world. In partnership with Indigenous Peoples, we advocate for Indigenous communities whose rights, cultures, and dignity are under threat. For more information go to http://www.cs.org

INEE’s Response to the UN’s Report on the Post-2015 Development Agenda

The movement towards ‘agreement’ on the post 2015 development goals is gathering pace, particularly with the publication of  a new report -read on……

INEE’s Response to the UN’s Report on the Post-2015 Development Agenda

Lori Heninger, INEE Director

On 30 May, the UN Secretary-General’s High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda released its report. The 27 member panel met multiple times over the past year, and their report provides recommendations on advancing international development beyond 2015. INEE welcomes this report, and congratulates the High-Level Panel for the forward-looking nature of the final document, specifically for the inclusion of education both in the body of the report, and as one of the 11 Universal Goals and National Targets.

The report links education to sustainability, and connects education and conflict, particularly through citing the 28 million of out-of-school children in situations of conflict. It also cites the need to move beyond access to primary education, and to ensure the completion of a full course of primary and early secondary education for all children and youth regardless of circumstance.

To read the full text and make your comment, please click here.

Education in Conflict Emergencies in the Context of the post-2015 MDG and EFA Agendas

More discussion on the post 2015 agenda.

Report of Policy Seminar: Education in Conflict Emergencies in the Context of the post-2015 MDG and EFA Agendas 
NORRAG

The NORRAG policy seminar on Education in Conflict Emergencies in the Context of the post-2015 MDG and EFA Agendas was held on 30 May 2013 at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (Geneva) with 25 participants from intergovernmental agencies (UN and EC), NGOs, research institutes and academia. The purpose of the policy seminar was to put the Education in Emergency (EIE) issues is some larger perspectives, to generate strategies of how to advocate for a suitable place for education and training in conflict emergency settings within post-2015 MDG and EFA policy frameworks, identifying the most appropriate advocacy messages, entry points and activities.

To download the report of the seminar, please click here.

 

Tools and Resources on Education and Inter-Sectoral Linkages

From INEE newsletter:

INEE Toolkit Highlight: Tools and Resources on Education and Inter-Sectoral Linkages
INEE

The INEE Toolkit provides resources on key thematic issues to help strengthen the implementation of the INEE Minimum Standards in particular thematic areas. Among others, the INEE Toolkit highlights tools and resources for promoting inter-sectoral linkages with education in emergencies. Education in emergencies practitioners can use these tools to help strengthen linkages between education andwater and sanitationfood and nutrition; and shelter.

For more information on INEE Key Thematic Issues, please click here

 

Training Module on Links Between Education and Other Sectors

During extreme situations people are highly focused within their sector – yet a child’s life is multidimensional not split between sectors, so it is particularly important to ensure clear linkages between sectors for the sake of the children who are often the innocent victims.

Training Module on Links Between Education and Other Sectors
INEE

The INEE-Education Cluster Training Package contains a module on Links Between Education and Other Sectors, which includes PowerPoint presentations, a facilitator’s guide, supplementary materials, and handouts. At the end of the session, participants will be able to: (1) understand the links between education and other sectors in all emergency phases-from preparedness, response to recovery; and (2) gain a better understanding of the various sectors that work in acute emergencies and which ones to liaise with when establishing emergency education programmes.

 

Based around the INEE Minimum Standards, this module encourages participants to reflect on strategies to provide holistic support to children and young people, especially in emergencies, it is essential to work with various sectors.

Access the Training Module on Links Between Education and Other Sectors here.