Accelerated Education resources in English, French, and Arabic

I have been privileged to have developed and implemented accelerated learning programmes in Vietnam and Tanzania, so know how important these are, particularly for children living in isolated/disadvantaged areas.

The article below is from the new INEE newsletter:

Accelerated Education resources in English, French, and Arabic
Accelerated Education Working Group

In 2016, the Accelerated Education Working Group (AEWG) developed 10 Principles for Effective Practice for Accelerated Education and an accompanying Guide to Accelerated Education Principles. The 10 Principles aim to clarify the essential components of an effective accelerated education program. Each principle contains evidence-informed best practices that can be viewed as a series of key actions or indicators to support the design, implementation, and evaluation of Accelerated Education work.

The AEWG is pleased to re-share these, and several accompanying resources, now available in English, French, and Arabic!

Key Resources

Visit the Accelerated Education page on the INEE website to find out more.

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Psychosocial Support

From the INEE newsletter

Guidance Note on Psychosocial Support
INEE

We are pleased to share with you a new INEE Guidance Note on Psychosocial Support. This Guidance Note is available for download in English in the INEE Resource Database. Translations of the Guidance Note have been completed in Arabic, French, Spanish, and Portuguese. INEE is in the process of designing the Arabic version (anticipated July/August 2018), and is looking for support to design the other language versions.

The purpose of the INEE Guidance Note on Psychosocial Support is to clarify the importance of supporting the psychosocial wellbeing of children and youth, and to offer specific strategies for how to incorporate psychosocial support (PSS) into education responses. This resource addresses a gap in the tools that are currently available to educators and professionals operating in emergency and crisis contexts, providing PSS guidance that is specifically oriented to the education sector.

This Guidance Note was conceptualized by the INEE Standards and Practice Working Group and the INEE Education Policy Working Group, and written by Zahirah McNatt, Dr. Neil Boothby, Dr. Mike Wessells, and Rita Lo of the Columbia Group for Children in Adversity (CGCA). Additional writing and technical research was provided by Jo Kelcey (NYU Steinhardt). A Reference Group of INEE Working Group members and external mental health, child protection, education, and psychosocial support experts reviewed drafts of the guidance.

Accelerated Learning -more from INEE

Having worked on accelerated learning programmes in Vietnam and Tanzania I know how important it is for marginalised and out of school children to ‘catch up’ and not waste any more years of their schooling.

Accelerated Education – thematic page, new resources, more…
Accelerated Education Working Group (AEWG)

Accelerated Education (AE) is flexible, age-appropriate programming that promotes access to education in an accelerated timeframe for disadvantaged groups.

In 2016, the Accelerated Education Working Group (AEWG)  developed 10 Principles for Effective Practice for Accelerated Education and an accompanying Guide to Accelerated Education Principles. Field testing of these two tools was conducted between mid-2016 and March 2017. Based on the results and recommendations from the field testing, the AEWG revised all of the guidance materials and launched the final tools in October 2017.

The final versions of these tools and other relevant resources can be found on the Accelerated Education thematic webpage on the INEE website – www.ineesite.org/accelerated-education. The materials include:

Refugee education

Some articles and posts from INEE newsletter:

Report: Education Disrupted, Education Denied  
Save the Children  

This is the second issue of the Save the Children Series. “In late May 2017, armed conflict between government forces and local armed group erupted in Marawi City, located in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) of the Philippines. Marawi residents started fleeing the city while the military sent in their reinforcements. An estimated 98 percent of the total population of Marawi City (201,785 individuals in 96 barangays, based on the 2015 census) have sought shelter in different evacuation centers or with their relatives. The crisis has also affected economic and commercial activities in the rest of Lanao del Sur province, triggering further displacement.”

Access the full report here.

Blog: Falling through the cracks – Young children in emergencies  
Sweta Shah, Senior Early Childhood Development and Education professional, Bernard van Leer Foundation  

“It was a bright morning in Ayillo 2 camp in Uganda.  South Sudanese refugee children between 3-5 years were standing in a circle starting their daily routines in a Plan International supported space.  The day started with the morning circle where children came for a half day of play based learning activities. Halima and two other South Sudanese refugee caregivers led the children in songs and games about health, hygiene and topics that promoted literacy and numeracy.  Next came the game “news news”.  A little boy went to the centre of the circle to announce the day’s news.  Everyone clapped to applaud his efforts.

The number of humanitarian crises is increasing, they are lasting longer and more children are being displaced.  The Lancet’s new ECD series estimated that 250 million children (43%) younger than 5 years in low and middle-income countries are at risk not reaching their developmental potential.  Emergencies add to children’s existing adversities, making it even more difficult to flourish.  Prior to the war, Syria’s literacy rate was high and now after six years of war and displacement, that rate has significantly decreased.  Doing nothing to solve humanitarian crises will impact the next generation of workers in the global economy.”

Read the full blog post here.

Blog: Teachers for Teachers: Hope for refugee children  
By Mading Peter Angong, Teacher from Shambe Primary School, Kakuma Refugee Camp 

“Education is the only tool that gives back the lost dignity to refugee children. The thirst for education among the multinational refugee children in Kakuma Refugee Camp is insatiable. Effective education is only achieved through effective teachers, for great teachers create great students. In fact, an inspired and informed teacher is the most important factor influencing student achievements.  Nowhere in the world are such teachers needed more than in Kakuma Refugee Camp in Turkana County, north-eastern Kenya.

The unexpected appearance of Teachers for Teachers led by members from Teachers College, Columbia University (TC), the Lutheran World Federation (LWF), UNHCR and Finn Church Aid (FCA) brought a needed solution: training, mentoring and coaching of teachers. Led by Dr. Mary Mendenhall and her team, the program in the camp was set in motion. The writer of this article, one of the teachers in Kakuma, benefited immensely from this training.”

Read the full blog post here.

 

 

and wait for this:

Working Paper: Protecting the right to education for refugees
UNESCO 

This resource was included in the July 18 issue of INEE’s Bi-Weekly Bulletin. It is currently under revision. We look forward to sharing the revised copy as soon as it is complete. 

“This Working Paper aims to provide an overview of the international legal framework protecting the right to education of refugees worldwide, including the obligations of States, as well as the main current issues. It also shows that, despite the existence of a strong applicable framework to guarantee the right to education of refugees worldwide, the challenges and obstacles encountered in this context may dramatically prevent its enjoyment. The paper also emphasizes that, even though ensuring the right to education is fundamental in all phases of the situation, there is a particular need to draw attention to the stabilization phase.”

Stay tuned for the revised working paper.

 

 

Where to find hope….

In these days, pessimism fills the media – so where do we find stories of hope for a better future?

Start here:

The Brightest Hope blog series
INEE

This once-a-week blog series features essays from the Education in Emergencies Essay Contest, which was organized by INEE and the UN Secretary-General’s Global Education First Initiative. INEEreceived 720 essay entries from 52 countries in four languages, from authors between the ages of seven and 68. Twelve of these essays made it into the final contest booklet entitled “The Brightest Hope“, and we will feature them in this blog series.

Common in all of the essay submissions from crisis-affected learners was a strong desire and an unyielding drive to continue or get back to education as quickly as possible. INEE works to increase awareness of the necessity and benefit in providing education alongside other lifesaving measures in humanitarian settings, and to elevate the voices of those whose education has been affected by emergencies.

Read the first two blog posts in the series now.

Education Cannot Wait

Education Cannot Wait
http://www.educationcannotwait.org

Introducing Education Cannot Wait a new global fund to transform the delivery of education in emergencies.

THE CHALLENGE
75 million school-aged children and youth are in desperate need of educational support, either in danger of, or already missing out on their education. Communities highlight the importance of education during times of crises, yet education appeals receive less than 2% of humanitarian funding. The right to education is most at risk during emergencies but it is also the exact time when it is needed the most.

THE RESPONSE
Education Cannot Wait joins up governments, humanitarian actors, and development efforts to deliver a more collaborative and rapid response to the educational needs of children and youth affected by crises. The fund aims to reach all crisis-affected children and youth with safe, free and quality education by 2030.

Click here to read the full investment case for education in emergencies.

Visit www.educationcannotwait.org for more information.

Posts that deal with access to education for children living in rural and isolated areas in Tanzania:

https://rayharris57.wordpress.com/2016/05/20/the-power-of-communities-sdg4/

https://rayharris57.wordpress.com/2016/03/08/sustainable-development-goal-4-i-e-sdg-4-2-can-we-achieve-it/

https://rayharris57.wordpress.com/2016/03/08/the-power-of-stories-and-storytelling-in-tanzania/

The State of the World’s Girls 2015: Unfinished Business

From INEE newsletter

Progress yes, but is it enough to make sustainable change?

Plan International 

Report
There have been important changes in the lives of adolescent girls and their access to education since the millennium, but the world still has a long way to go in the struggle for gender equality. The 2015 State of the World’s Girls report brings together 14 prominent contributors who hail progress made in realising girls’ rights, but lament the fact that girls still face huge challenges.

This is a threshold moment, the contributors write, where the gains made in maternal mortality, female education and legal protection under the umbrella of the Millennium Development Goals can be built upon by the Sustainable Development Goals, which have gender equality at their centre. But they stress that without economic empowerment and equitable education, no further gains can be made.

The Unfinished Business of Girls’ Rights is the ninth report in Plan International’s annual State of the World’s Girls series. It is available to read in English, French, and Spanish. All the previous reports are available on the Plan International website.

Click to download the report.