Edtech for Learning in Emergencies and Displaced Settings

Having some success with simple mobile phones for monitoring the work of volunteers in Tanzania -it is good to see the explosion of possibilities for using mobile technologies, particularly for isolated and rural contexts.

[REVIEW] Edtech for Learning in Emergencies and Displaced Settings
Michaelle Tauson and Luke Stannard, Save the Children

The purpose of this report is to build an understanding of ‘what works’ in educational technology (EdTech) to ensure that children can learn in crisis or displaced settings. The field of EdTech is vast, and has influenced almost every facet of modern educational delivery. This report will focus on ‘child facing’ EdTech, which refers to technology – both software and hardware – designed directly for use by the child or by a teacher, parent, or facilitator working with a child.

Overall, this report amasses evidence to develop a more nuanced understanding of what is required to implement effective and ethical EdTech programmes that lead to children learning, asking the research question: How can the utilisation of EdTech (at home or at school) for teaching and learning best facilitate the learning process of children in crisis-affected settings?

Click to read a blog post about this resource and download this resource.

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Hear it from the Children!

We know about Children’s Rights to express themselves, but their voices are still stifled in many countries – when they do get the opportunity, they are worth listening to…

Report: Hear It From The Children
Save the Children South Sudan

Save the Children South Sudan launched a new report titled ‘Hear It From The Children’. The report provides a fascinating insight into what children from communities that have been most affected by the South Sudan conflict consider to be their top priorities. A clear message has emerged from the children, and it is that, “…we want to learn – even during war.” It is a simple but powerful message that challenges us all to re-think how we can best respond to children’s needs in times of conflict.

Click here to download the report.

Education in Emergencies – is it important?

Hear it From the Children:

Why Education in Emergencies is Critical

NRC and Save the Children

Children, parents and community leaders affected by armed conflict say education is a number one priority after they have reached safety or violence has died down, says a new study by Save the Children and the Norwegian Refugee Council.

Worldwide, millions of children affected by armed conflict are being denied the opportunity to go to school. During armed fighting, children and young people are exposed to serious violations. They risk being recruited into armed groups or join them voluntarily when they see this as the only option available; they are exposed, sometimes recurrently, to severe forms of violence, including sexual violence, as well as to early marriage; or they are deprived of a childhood when the situation forces them into adult roles in order to survive and cope.

The study “Hear it from the Children” presents the voices of over 250 children, parents, teachers and community representatives who were severely affected by conflict and who are living in Masisi, in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) or who sought shelter in Dollo Ado camp, Ethiopia. Their message is clear: education is a number one priority.

To read the full report, please click here.

Why Education in Emergencies is Critical

My last post had a focus on peace education and the article below reminds us why peace education is so important:

From INEE newsletter

Hear it From the Children: Why Education in Emergencies is Critical
NRC and Save the Children

Children, parents and community leaders affected by armed conflict say education is a number one priority after they have reached safety or violence has died down, says a new study by Save the Children and the Norwegian Refugee Council.

Worldwide, millions of children affected by armed conflict are being denied the opportunity to go to school. During armed fighting, children and young people are exposed to serious violations. They risk being recruited into armed groups or join them voluntarily when they see this as the only option available; they are exposed, sometimes recurrently, to severe forms of violence, including sexual violence, as well as to early marriage; or they are deprived of a childhood when the situation forces them into adult roles in order to survive and cope.

The study “Hear it from the Children” presents the voices of over 250 children, parents, teachers and community representatives who were severely affected by conflict and who are living in Masisi, in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) or who sought shelter in Dollo Ado camp, Ethiopia. Their message is clear: education is a number one priority.

To read the full report, please click here.

Framework for the Future

There has been much talk and much blogging about the ‘post 2015’ agenda -in other words what should be the international goals following the Millenium Development Goals? Many organisations have participated in debates and discussions and publshed position papers – here is one example:

Framework for the Future
Save the Children

Save the Children’s new report, Framework for the Future presents our vision for a universal post-2015 sustainable development framework to replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) building upon our initial framework outlined in Ending Poverty in Our Generation that was released in January 2013.

The report presents twelve concrete goals with associated targets that, if achieved, would help build a world that is prosperous, resilient and free from poverty. To address key weaknesses in the MDGs and to help tackle inequalities, our proposed universal framework introduces key measures including interim “stepping stone” equity targets as well as goals and targets that integrate economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development.

To read the full report, please click here.

The Right to Learn – Community Participation in Improving Learning

As the ‘community’ is out of the jurisdiction of ‘formal education’ it is often left as an afterthought during education planning. We know that without the real learning context in which all children grow up and are nurtured (hopefully) then relevant contextualised learning is less likely to take place. This report reminds us of the importance of community at all levels.

The Right to Learn: Community Participation in Improving Learning
Save the Children

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the Education for All (EFA) goals have been the catalyst for progress in ensuring access to education. Since governments first endorsed these goals in 2000, around 45 million children1 who previously did not have access to education have enrolled in primary school and gender parity in primary education has improved significantly. With 2015 deadlines fast approaching, the world must now assess the considerable work that remains to be done and negotiate an ambitious yet achievable successor framework.

In their report, Save the Children makes the following recommendations:

  1. UN Member States should advance an ambitious equitable learning goal in the post-2015 agenda that provides a framework for national level targets and minimum standards for learning against which governments and education providers can be held to account.
  2. As the Open Working Group begins drafting a post-2015 goal framework and intergovernmental negotiations progress, UN Member States should ensure citizen voices from the Global South – especially civil society – inform the process.
  3. Member States should ensure that any post-2015 framework is accompanied by a stand-alone goal to advance open, accountable and inclusive governance.
  4. UN Member States should ensure that a post-2015 learning goal is accompanied by strengthened national and local accountability frameworks through which education provision and learning outcomes can be monitored by parents and communities.

To read the full report, please click here.

INCLUSIVE EDUCATION -INEE Training Module and more….

Apart from good content on Inclusive Education this module is a good model for supporting facilitation of workshops:

INEE Training Module -Inclusive Education

INEE

This is Module 15 of the INEE education in emergencies harmonized training package. It contains a facilitator’s guide and PowerPoint slides for a basic 2-hour workshop, with suggested extension activities for longer workshops.

You can download a Zip file containing the facilitation notes and PowerPoint slides.

 

 

 

and from Save some case studies of Inclusive Education:

Impact on Education
Save the Children

 

This document contains articles from the a variety of Save the Children’s education programmes in Africa, including articles about: Somaliland, featuring a girl disabled by a landmine who continued her schooling through an alternative basic education programme; non-formal education in LRA-affected areas of northern Uganda; and displaced learners returning to education in Côte d’Ivoire.

Download Impact on Education

 

 

And something more while we are talking about Inclusive Education…

Children of Armenia speak out…. About inclusive education and good teachers
World Vision

These 2 posters are a by-product of an evaluation of an inclusive education project carried out in Armenia. During the evaluation, school children offered very useful insights, and rather than these opinions being lost in a formal report that few people would read, they were also turned into posters for use within the schools and for wider advocacy among NGOs, parents, teachers and the government. They have been used to promote both IE and the concept of child voice/child participation. Again, could this be an idea for the Task Team to follow up – i.e. developing advocacy/awareness-raising outputs that specifically feature children’s perspectives on inclusion/exclusion in education in emergencies?

Download poster 1 Children of Armenia speak out… about inclusive education
Download poster 2 Children of Armenia speak out… about good teachers