New Training Module on Adolescents and Youth Programming in Emergencies

INEE has announced a new training module:

The New Training Module on Adolescents and Youth Programming in Emergencies is part of the INEE Education in Emergencies training package.

The Adolescents and Youth Programming in Emergencies module complements the rest of the training package by promoting the specific needs, opportunities, and good programming practices of youth in emergency programs and policy decisions.  It provides tools for supporting integration and achieving quality and accessible education for all. The module consists of presentations, handouts, interactive dialogue sections, and exercises to guide participants. The module can be tailored for the beginner learner or it can be used with advanced practitioners.

 

The main objectives of the training module are to:

  • identify challenges and vulnerabilities specific to adolescents and youth in crisis and post-crisis situations as well as the ways in which they can make valuable contributions to their families, schools, and communities;
  • review good practices and specific recommendations for effective, quality programming for adolescents and youth; and
  • learn practical ways to promote meaningful participation for adolescents and youth in programming.

The module, which builds on a variety of youth-related INEE resources, was developed by Brooke Breazeale, in consultation with other members of the INEE Adolescents and Youth Task Team, the INEE Working Group on Minimum Standards and Network Tools, and the IASC Education Cluster.

 

The INEE Adolescent and Youth Task Team works to ensure a coordinated, accelerated, and evidence-based response to the educational rights, needs, and aspirations of adolescents and youth affected by crisis. The Task Team collaboratively develops resources and tools, advocates for youth-inclusive programming, and facilitates training and capacity building to help practitioners respond to youth and education challenges faced during situations of crisis and recovery. To find out more go to the Adolescents and Youth Task Team webpage. To join the Task Team, email youthtaskteam@ineesite.org.

 

Explore the whole Education in Emergencies Training Package 

The package contains the following modules with presentations, facilitators’ guides and exercises, available on the INEE Toolkit.

0.   Guidance and Time Tabling

1.   The Rationale for Education in Emergencies

2.   INEE Minimum Standards Framework

3.   Technical Components for Education in Emergencies

4.   Education in Emergencies Coordination

5.   Action Planning and Follow-Up

6.   Assessment

7.   Programme Design, Monitoring and Evaluation

8.   Links Between Education and Other Sectors

9.   Contingency Planning

10.  Early Recovery and Transition

11.  Advocacy and Policy

12.  Risk Reduction

13.  Teaching and Learning

14.  Human Rights and Accountability

15.  Inclusive Education

16. Gender Responsive Education

For more information and questions on the Education in Emergencies Training Package and capacity development initiatives of INEE and the Education Cluster, please contact

 

Africa Progress Report 2012: Jobs, Justice, and Equity

Having just returned from Tanzania, where I have been working on Inclusive Education, I can vouch for the need to tackle both access and quality in education.

Read more from this report, which was publicized in the  INEE  newsletter.

Africa Progress Report 2012: Jobs, Justice, and Equity

(Africa Progress Panel)

Urgent action is needed to tackle a “twin crisis” in access to education and the quality of teaching, according to the Africa Progress Report 2012: Jobs, Justice and Equity: Seizing Opportunities in Times of Global Change, which was launched on Friday at the World Economic Forum on Africa, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Calling for a stronger focus on education, along with better funding mechanisms, the report says African governments and their development partners should make a “big push” towards the 2015 development goals, “focusing on the most disadvantaged countries, children who are being left behind and the need to improve learning achievement.”

The full report is available here.  

TRAINING: Managing Gender-Based Violence Programmes in Emergencies: E-Learning Companion Guide

I have been working in Tanzania and some of the reports of gender based violence are really quite unbelievable. Girls  may be married early, be abused and end up pregnant  and leaving school, be caned for arriving late at school and the list goes on.

This free e-learning course supports our work when managing gender based violence programmes -particularly in emergencies.

This is brought to our attention through the INEE newsletter

TRAINING: Managing Gender-Based Violence Programmes in Emergencies: E-Learning Companion Guide.

(UNFPA)

UNFPA has launched a companion guide to its free e-learning course for professionals who are working to address Gender Based Violence in humanitarian contexts.

 

The e-learning course uses problems that practitioners currently face and case scenarios from real-life humanitarian contexts to guide learning. Integrated throughout the modules are videos, learning activities and quizzes that both engage the learner, and support participants’ varying learning styles. The new companion guide not only covers all of the content in the e-learning, but also provides new case studies, sample tools, best practices, and activities.

 

For more information, click here

 

Crimes of War: What the Public Should Know – Educator’s Guide – HREA

From Human Rights Education Association (HREA)

Crimes of War: What the Public Should Know – Educator’s Guide

April is Genocide Remembrance Month. The Crimes of War – Educator’s Guide provides rich content on war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. It consists of eight thematic chapters: weapons; violence against civilians; child soldiers; sexual violence; terrorism and torture; genocide; international courts and tribunals; and humanitarian intervention. The Educator’s Guide is intended for use in senior level high school classes, advanced placement classes and university classes. Learn more:http://www.hrea.org/crimesofwar

And some new resources have been added to their library:

A Guide to Using the Protocol on the Rights of Women in Africa for Legal Action (Equality Now, 2011). Language(s): English, French. Keywords: guide, reference guide, judges, lawyers, NGO staff, female genital mutilation/female genital cutting, gender equality, reproductive health, sexual violence, violence against women, women’s human rights, African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, Convention on the Elimination of All Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), Optional Protocol to CEDAW, Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa, African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights, African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, African Union (formerly Organisation of African Unity, OAU), Committee on the Elimination of All forms of Discrimination Against Women, Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Women in Africa, UN Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women, Africa.

Capacity Assessment Manual for National Human Rights Institutions by Asia Pacific Forum of National Human Rights Institutions, OHCHR, UNDP (Bangkok: Asia-Pacific Regional Centre United Nations Development Programme, 2011). Language(s): English. Keywords: manual, human rights-based approach (HRBA), national human rights institutions.

Human Rights-Based Approaches to Development Education: A toolkit for activists in new EU member states (Minority Rights Group International, 2010). Language(s): English, Hungarian, Latvian, Polish, Slovak, Slovenian. Keywords: NGO staff, development education, human rights education, human rights-based approach (HRBA), Millennium Development Goals, Hungary, Latvia, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia.

RIGHTS NOW: A Training Manual on ASEAN Human Rights Mechanisms (Bangkok: Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA), 2011). Language(s): English. Keywords: reference, training manual, community leaders, NGO staff, children’s rights, migrant workers, women’s human rights, ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC), ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR), Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Southeast Asia.

Training for Human Rights Educatin on Human Rights Clubs in Schools: Training Manual (Madurai: Institute of Human Rights Education, 2010). English. Keywords: training manual, trainers, secondary school, teacher training, training of trainers, children’s rights, human rights education, women’s human rights, India.

UNHCR Protection Training Manual for European Border and Entry Officials (Geneva: UNHCR, 2011). Language(s): English. Keywords: training manual, government officials, law enforcement officials, NGO staff, asylum seekers, freedom of movement, migrant workers, refugee law, refugees, trafficking in persons, European Union.

Women’s Rights in Muslim Communities: A Resource Guide for Human Rights Educators by Equitas and Direktorat Jenderal HAM Departemen Hukum Dan Hak Asasi Manusia (Montréal: Equitas, 2009). Language(s): English. Keywords:  reference, trainers, equality before the law, freedom of movement, freedom of religion, gender equality, reproductive health, women’s human rights, Beijing Declaration on the Rights of Women, Convention on the Elimination of All Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), Indonesia.

 Check out the site for yourself   hrea

New Training Module – Human Rights and Accountability

Education in Emergencies used to be the forgotten dimension in emergency work as the immediate reaction was to deal with more structural dimensions of an emergency such as health,  food , water and shelter. The work of INEE has changed all that and provided emergency teams with a comprehensive package of guidance ,developed by practitioners in the field.

INEE and the Global Education Cluster have added a new training module on Human Rights and Accountability to the Education in Emergencies harmonized training package.

 

The Human Rights and Accountability Training Module complements the rest of the training package by creating awareness around human rights and serving as a tool to achieve quality education and a life of dignity. The module includes a Powerpoint presentation, handouts, interactive dialogue sections and exercises to guide participants through the various steps of using Human Rights in their education work. Learning points include good practices to support rights-holders, as well as how to identify key duty-bearers and lines of accountability available to affected populations and education actors.

 

The module was developed for INEE and the IASC Education Cluster by Peter Hyll-Larsen andActionAid International – The Right to Education Project, in consultation with members of the Education Cluster Working Group and the INEE Working Group on Minimum Standards and INEE Tools. The Right to Education Project aims to promote social mobilisation and legal accountability by focusing on the legal challenges to the right to education.

 

Explore the Education in Emergencies Training Package!

The package contains the following 14 modules with presentations, facilitators’ guides and exercises, available on the INEE Toolkit. Modules on Youth, Gender and Inclusive Education are currently under development.

0.    Guidance and Time Tabling

1.    The Rationale for Education in Emergencies

2.    INEE Minimum Standards Framework

3.    Technical Components for Education in Emergencies

4.    Education in Emergencies Coordination

5.    Action Planning and Follow-Up

6.    Assessment

7.    Programme Design, Monitoring and Evaluation

8.    Links Between Education and Other Sectors

9.    Contingency Planning

10.  Early Recovery and Transition

11.  Advocacy and Policy

12.  Risk Reduction

13.  Teaching and Learning

14.  Human Rights and Accountability

OTHER TRAINING AND CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES

 

E-learning Module on the INEE Minimum Standards: Learn more about the INEE Minimum Standards through the INEE e-learning module. The module employes a variety of resources and methods and uses the Darfur refugee crisis as an example to demonstrate how the INEE Minimum Standards can be used as a framework for designing quality education programmes in conflict-induced situations.

 

Training Adaptations: The Education in Emergencies Training Package has already been used in many contexts, and the training materials have been adapted to suit the context and participants’ needs for each training. The training adaptations are available on the INEE website. If you wish to share your training agenda and supporting materials, please contact minimumstandards@ineesite.org.

 

For more information and questions on the Education in Emergencies Training Package and capacity development initiatives of INEE and the Education Cluster, please contactminimumstandards@ineesite.org and educationclusterunit@gmail.com.

 

Towards an Education Sector-Level Conflict Analysis

PUBLICATION: Towards Education Sector-Level Conflict Analysis: A Review of the INEE Workshop Methodology

(Journal of Peace, Conflict and Development)

New approaches are being developed to reveal how the education sector is not only affected by conflict but also serves as a possible medium for unintentionally – or deliberately – reinforcing and perpetuating conflict. Such innovative analytic frameworks are being developed by the Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE) Working Group on Education and Fragility. This report summarises lessons learned and recommendations for a workshop methodology towards good practice for sector-level conflict analysis.

The full report is available here.   

Youth Employment: Youth Perspectives on the Pursuit of Decent Work in Changing Times

Another reference from the INEE newsletter:

 Youth Employment: Youth Perspectives on the Pursuit of Decent Work in Changing Times

 

Today we have the largest generation of young people the world has ever known. They are demanding their rights and a greater voice in economic and political life. We need to pull the UN system together like never before to support a new social contract of job-rich economic growth. Let us start with young people!

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

 

The latest World Youth Report explores the transition of young people from schools and training institutions into the labour market, a phase marking a critical period in the life cycle. The current employment scenario for young people, worsened by the global economic crisis, poses an urgent challenge with long-term implications for both young people and society as a whole. Young people themselves are crucial stakeholders in the pursuit of decent and productive work for all. Yet, too frequently, their voices go unheard and their positive and negative experiences and viewpoints unshared, particularly with decision-makers

A summary of the report is available here

 

Most young workers in developing countries are in the informal economy, which includes unpaid family work to which young people often contribute (International Labour Organization, 2010, p. 3). Work in the informal economy does not provide access to entitlements such as health insurance, social security and other social protection measures.