Investing in early education…

 

It looks as if ECCE is creeping up the agenda finally:

BlogInvesting in early education is even more crucial in fragile contexts 
Global Partnership for Education 

GPE 2020, GPE’s strategic plan for 2016 – 2020, commits to improving the quality and availability of early childhood care and education (ECCE) for children ages 3-8, especially for marginalized children and those living in countries affected by conflict and fragility.

There is growing interest in the role of ECCE programs in promoting peacebuilding. The foundations of development and learning are laid in the first five years of life – including behavior traits, the ability to manage conflicts, and cultural norms and identities.

Most early childhood development curriculum cover socio-emotional development and many programs have early reading materials that promote diversity and pro-social development, but promoting peacebuilding and security is also crucial to the long-term vision and policy priorities of fragile and conflict-affected countries.”

Read the full blog post here.

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Strengthening teacher professional development through collaboration 

From the INEE newsletter:

BlogTeachers in Crisis Contexts Working Group – Strengthening teacher professional development through collaboration 
Mary Mendenhall, Assistant Professor of Practice at Teachers College, Columbia University

“As we work to improve the overall quality and effectiveness of ourhumanitarian responses by improving coordination, reducing duplication, and trying to mitigate the competitive environment in which we work, the Teachers in Crisis Contexts (TiCC) Working Group provides a notable example within the field of Education in Emergencies. The TiCC began over three years ago when a small group of individuals from different organizations came together to respond to the needs of refugees and other displaced persons teaching in crisis-affected contexts. This group was adamant about moving away from ineffective one-off teacher training workshops and to put in motion the development of a model and related materials to strengthen teacher professional development in crisis settings and other contexts of instability. This work was further buoyed by Mary Burns and James Lawrie’s work – Where It’s Needed Most: Quality Professional Development for All Teachers – which provided a clarion call for why teachers in crisis contexts need and deserve more support.”

Read the full blog post here.

It is amazing and worrying that one off teacher training activities still exist, but they do! The only future is for teachers to work together more, share experience and good ideas, observe ,comment and support and learn horizontally -not top down.

I like the sentence:

the professional development model that we have designed together, an approach that fosters constructive communications, active participation, collegiality, concern for everyone’s well-being, and, of course, a little bit of fun along the way.

 

My philosophy when planning teacher training too!

Refugee education

Some articles and posts from INEE newsletter:

Report: Education Disrupted, Education Denied  
Save the Children  

This is the second issue of the Save the Children Series. “In late May 2017, armed conflict between government forces and local armed group erupted in Marawi City, located in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) of the Philippines. Marawi residents started fleeing the city while the military sent in their reinforcements. An estimated 98 percent of the total population of Marawi City (201,785 individuals in 96 barangays, based on the 2015 census) have sought shelter in different evacuation centers or with their relatives. The crisis has also affected economic and commercial activities in the rest of Lanao del Sur province, triggering further displacement.”

Access the full report here.

Blog: Falling through the cracks – Young children in emergencies  
Sweta Shah, Senior Early Childhood Development and Education professional, Bernard van Leer Foundation  

“It was a bright morning in Ayillo 2 camp in Uganda.  South Sudanese refugee children between 3-5 years were standing in a circle starting their daily routines in a Plan International supported space.  The day started with the morning circle where children came for a half day of play based learning activities. Halima and two other South Sudanese refugee caregivers led the children in songs and games about health, hygiene and topics that promoted literacy and numeracy.  Next came the game “news news”.  A little boy went to the centre of the circle to announce the day’s news.  Everyone clapped to applaud his efforts.

The number of humanitarian crises is increasing, they are lasting longer and more children are being displaced.  The Lancet’s new ECD series estimated that 250 million children (43%) younger than 5 years in low and middle-income countries are at risk not reaching their developmental potential.  Emergencies add to children’s existing adversities, making it even more difficult to flourish.  Prior to the war, Syria’s literacy rate was high and now after six years of war and displacement, that rate has significantly decreased.  Doing nothing to solve humanitarian crises will impact the next generation of workers in the global economy.”

Read the full blog post here.

Blog: Teachers for Teachers: Hope for refugee children  
By Mading Peter Angong, Teacher from Shambe Primary School, Kakuma Refugee Camp 

“Education is the only tool that gives back the lost dignity to refugee children. The thirst for education among the multinational refugee children in Kakuma Refugee Camp is insatiable. Effective education is only achieved through effective teachers, for great teachers create great students. In fact, an inspired and informed teacher is the most important factor influencing student achievements.  Nowhere in the world are such teachers needed more than in Kakuma Refugee Camp in Turkana County, north-eastern Kenya.

The unexpected appearance of Teachers for Teachers led by members from Teachers College, Columbia University (TC), the Lutheran World Federation (LWF), UNHCR and Finn Church Aid (FCA) brought a needed solution: training, mentoring and coaching of teachers. Led by Dr. Mary Mendenhall and her team, the program in the camp was set in motion. The writer of this article, one of the teachers in Kakuma, benefited immensely from this training.”

Read the full blog post here.

 

 

and wait for this:

Working Paper: Protecting the right to education for refugees
UNESCO 

This resource was included in the July 18 issue of INEE’s Bi-Weekly Bulletin. It is currently under revision. We look forward to sharing the revised copy as soon as it is complete. 

“This Working Paper aims to provide an overview of the international legal framework protecting the right to education of refugees worldwide, including the obligations of States, as well as the main current issues. It also shows that, despite the existence of a strong applicable framework to guarantee the right to education of refugees worldwide, the challenges and obstacles encountered in this context may dramatically prevent its enjoyment. The paper also emphasizes that, even though ensuring the right to education is fundamental in all phases of the situation, there is a particular need to draw attention to the stabilization phase.”

Stay tuned for the revised working paper.

 

 

Where to find hope….

In these days, pessimism fills the media – so where do we find stories of hope for a better future?

Start here:

The Brightest Hope blog series
INEE

This once-a-week blog series features essays from the Education in Emergencies Essay Contest, which was organized by INEE and the UN Secretary-General’s Global Education First Initiative. INEEreceived 720 essay entries from 52 countries in four languages, from authors between the ages of seven and 68. Twelve of these essays made it into the final contest booklet entitled “The Brightest Hope“, and we will feature them in this blog series.

Common in all of the essay submissions from crisis-affected learners was a strong desire and an unyielding drive to continue or get back to education as quickly as possible. INEE works to increase awareness of the necessity and benefit in providing education alongside other lifesaving measures in humanitarian settings, and to elevate the voices of those whose education has been affected by emergencies.

Read the first two blog posts in the series now.

Education Cannot Wait

Education Cannot Wait
http://www.educationcannotwait.org

Introducing Education Cannot Wait a new global fund to transform the delivery of education in emergencies.

THE CHALLENGE
75 million school-aged children and youth are in desperate need of educational support, either in danger of, or already missing out on their education. Communities highlight the importance of education during times of crises, yet education appeals receive less than 2% of humanitarian funding. The right to education is most at risk during emergencies but it is also the exact time when it is needed the most.

THE RESPONSE
Education Cannot Wait joins up governments, humanitarian actors, and development efforts to deliver a more collaborative and rapid response to the educational needs of children and youth affected by crises. The fund aims to reach all crisis-affected children and youth with safe, free and quality education by 2030.

Click here to read the full investment case for education in emergencies.

Visit www.educationcannotwait.org for more information.

Posts that deal with access to education for children living in rural and isolated areas in Tanzania:

https://rayharris57.wordpress.com/2016/05/20/the-power-of-communities-sdg4/

https://rayharris57.wordpress.com/2016/03/08/sustainable-development-goal-4-i-e-sdg-4-2-can-we-achieve-it/

https://rayharris57.wordpress.com/2016/03/08/the-power-of-stories-and-storytelling-in-tanzania/

ICT and education in crisis….

ICT and education in crisis situations.

While working in Tanzania I have realised how a simple mobile phone can support education in rural and isolated communities,so I know ICT can make a difference-what about other marginalised learners?

Can Technology Make a Difference for Education in Conflict and Crisis?

Dr. Negin Dahya, University of Washington, commissioned by GIZ and partners

The use of information and communication technology (ICT) has the potential to support, enhance, and enable education for the most marginalized learners in conflict and crisis settings. A recently released Landscape Review fills knowledge gaps about the use of mobile technology in education in emergencies, lessons learned and opportunities.

The full report is also complemented by three self-paced online learning modules on ICT4E with refugees. The learning modules can be downloaded here. The review and learning modules identify major trends, patterns, knowledge gaps and lessons learned about the use of mobile technologies in crisis and conflict settings and synthesizes key themes and considerations for practitioners and policy makers in this field. The online modules also emphasize practical examples.

Click here to access the report.

Timor Leste – rising!

I have just received an email from Jorge, my translator when I started working in Timor Leste (East Timor), who then transformed himself into an excellent trainer. He writes:

I have just returned from Lequidoe sub district (Aileu),  the first place where the 100 Friendly Schools project was piloted. I found no more signs of the 1999 destruction with roofless houses and burnt out schools . I met a healthy young generation with happy faces, motivated, better educated who seem ambitious to take over development from the older people in this particular area.
They enjoy electricity in their villages, own motorbikes and trucks, new buildings, new facilities, new dresses, new and qualified teachers and much more…..
A reminder of what 1999 was like..
“Militia set fire to my house on September 1999. I evacuated to Atambua with my parents. We lived in a refugee camp in Soskoe with many other people. I went back to East Timor with my mother”.
Junito Emilio Soares, “Through the eyes of the Children”- UNICEF.
and the hope for the future:

We believe , the young people who have defended this country have the strength and ability for this very important task. With love and devotion we will succeed in rebuilding our nation from ashes and create a better future that is full of peace, freedom,democracy and justice”.

Joanita Moreira da Silva, “Through the eyes of the children”.UNICEF.

Although it has taken more than 14 years to reach this point, we are all hoping that some stability in the country will provide the economic development that can unite the different factions and maintain the progress outlined by Jorge.
Click on p.10 to get some idea of how the schools looked after the militia had stolen everything and then set fire to the schools to ensure the new nation started with nothing but their determination.
This page is from the 100 Schools Booklet ( designed by Shakun Harris and published by UNICEF) and other pages illustrate the re-building of the education system. Most teachers had left the country (they were Indonesian) and so volunteers came ‘from the rice fields into the classroom’  and were enthusuastic learners.
Our first workshops together produced a wealth of learning aids (from whatever we could find, whether it was an old flip flop to a local adhesive that is found in a tree) and enthusiastic new teachers. Jorge came into his own when he offered to run a session at a workshop and was so well prepared and capable that there was no doubting his future as a trainer.
You can see Jorge at the bottom of page 14
Timor Leste continues to rise……