Promoting literacy in a multilingual society

In Tanzania we are working in 7 regions, 5 of which have many children (70% of our target population) do not speak the language of instruction (Kiswahili) at home. These children arrive at primary standard 1 knowing very little Kiswahili and therefore understanding very little of what the teacher is saying. Obviously by standard 3 these children are noticeably failing and are vulnerable. Through EQUIP-Tanzania’s short 16 week School Readiness intervention, some of these children (200,000 at present) are not only surviving their first taste of formal education, but are actually thriving. The least we can do is be more child centred and welcome all children into school.

World Education Blog

By Paula Korsnakova, Senior Research and Liaison Advisor, IEA

Reflecting on the results of providing instruction in a language other than the one spoken at home

Did you know that apparently 66% of children in the world are raised to speak more than one language? Countries where more than one language is commonly spoken have demands for both linguistic and cultural diversity in their curricula.

Reading comprehension is perhaps the most critical foundation for improved attainment in most school subjects, including mathematics and science, supporting an improved and enhanced overall school experience.

iea policy briefA recent policy brief by Sarah Howie and Megan Chamberlain investigated the effect of instruction in a second language on reading performance in nine countries using the results of the 2011 round of IEA’s Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS). This taken place in regular five-year cycles since 2001 at grade 4 level. The authors…

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Refugee education

Some articles and posts from INEE newsletter:

Report: Education Disrupted, Education Denied  
Save the Children  

This is the second issue of the Save the Children Series. “In late May 2017, armed conflict between government forces and local armed group erupted in Marawi City, located in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) of the Philippines. Marawi residents started fleeing the city while the military sent in their reinforcements. An estimated 98 percent of the total population of Marawi City (201,785 individuals in 96 barangays, based on the 2015 census) have sought shelter in different evacuation centers or with their relatives. The crisis has also affected economic and commercial activities in the rest of Lanao del Sur province, triggering further displacement.”

Access the full report here.

Blog: Falling through the cracks – Young children in emergencies  
Sweta Shah, Senior Early Childhood Development and Education professional, Bernard van Leer Foundation  

“It was a bright morning in Ayillo 2 camp in Uganda.  South Sudanese refugee children between 3-5 years were standing in a circle starting their daily routines in a Plan International supported space.  The day started with the morning circle where children came for a half day of play based learning activities. Halima and two other South Sudanese refugee caregivers led the children in songs and games about health, hygiene and topics that promoted literacy and numeracy.  Next came the game “news news”.  A little boy went to the centre of the circle to announce the day’s news.  Everyone clapped to applaud his efforts.

The number of humanitarian crises is increasing, they are lasting longer and more children are being displaced.  The Lancet’s new ECD series estimated that 250 million children (43%) younger than 5 years in low and middle-income countries are at risk not reaching their developmental potential.  Emergencies add to children’s existing adversities, making it even more difficult to flourish.  Prior to the war, Syria’s literacy rate was high and now after six years of war and displacement, that rate has significantly decreased.  Doing nothing to solve humanitarian crises will impact the next generation of workers in the global economy.”

Read the full blog post here.

Blog: Teachers for Teachers: Hope for refugee children  
By Mading Peter Angong, Teacher from Shambe Primary School, Kakuma Refugee Camp 

“Education is the only tool that gives back the lost dignity to refugee children. The thirst for education among the multinational refugee children in Kakuma Refugee Camp is insatiable. Effective education is only achieved through effective teachers, for great teachers create great students. In fact, an inspired and informed teacher is the most important factor influencing student achievements.  Nowhere in the world are such teachers needed more than in Kakuma Refugee Camp in Turkana County, north-eastern Kenya.

The unexpected appearance of Teachers for Teachers led by members from Teachers College, Columbia University (TC), the Lutheran World Federation (LWF), UNHCR and Finn Church Aid (FCA) brought a needed solution: training, mentoring and coaching of teachers. Led by Dr. Mary Mendenhall and her team, the program in the camp was set in motion. The writer of this article, one of the teachers in Kakuma, benefited immensely from this training.”

Read the full blog post here.

 

 

and wait for this:

Working Paper: Protecting the right to education for refugees
UNESCO 

This resource was included in the July 18 issue of INEE’s Bi-Weekly Bulletin. It is currently under revision. We look forward to sharing the revised copy as soon as it is complete. 

“This Working Paper aims to provide an overview of the international legal framework protecting the right to education of refugees worldwide, including the obligations of States, as well as the main current issues. It also shows that, despite the existence of a strong applicable framework to guarantee the right to education of refugees worldwide, the challenges and obstacles encountered in this context may dramatically prevent its enjoyment. The paper also emphasizes that, even though ensuring the right to education is fundamental in all phases of the situation, there is a particular need to draw attention to the stabilization phase.”

Stay tuned for the revised working paper.

 

 

Curriculum , Chile and Climate Change

At the end of last month, the Chilean president, Michelle Bachelet, said that climate change would become an obligatory subject for students to learn in the third and fourth grades of secondary school in history and science classes. The President said, while making the announcement: “We are confident of the effects that this policy can […]

via Good news: Chile is going to cover climate change in its curriculum — World Education Blog