International Day of Peace – Losing out on learning

Of course we need at least 365 days of Peace, but let us try and grab what we can.

Without talking about the disgrace of holding arms ‘fairs’ such as those in London recently, perhaps we can look at how to keep refugees educated.

We can get people on to the moon and develop a nuclear weapon, but cannot provide refugee children with some basic technology to keep participating in education , on the move. There are accelerated learning programmes which can be facilitated by local volunteers, but our practical thinking still leaves us without governmental interest in the future human resource of their countries.

 

By Joseph Nhan-O’Reilly, Head of Education Policy & Advocacy and Sébastien Hine, Education Research Adviser at Save the Children The world is now witnessing the highest levels of displacement on record. According to UNHCR, an unprecedented 65.6 million people around the world have been forced from their homes. Among them are nearly 22.5 million refugees, […]

via Losing out on learning: Action to ensure refugee children get an education — World Education Blog

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Refugee education

Some articles and posts from INEE newsletter:

Report: Education Disrupted, Education Denied  
Save the Children  

This is the second issue of the Save the Children Series. “In late May 2017, armed conflict between government forces and local armed group erupted in Marawi City, located in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) of the Philippines. Marawi residents started fleeing the city while the military sent in their reinforcements. An estimated 98 percent of the total population of Marawi City (201,785 individuals in 96 barangays, based on the 2015 census) have sought shelter in different evacuation centers or with their relatives. The crisis has also affected economic and commercial activities in the rest of Lanao del Sur province, triggering further displacement.”

Access the full report here.

Blog: Falling through the cracks – Young children in emergencies  
Sweta Shah, Senior Early Childhood Development and Education professional, Bernard van Leer Foundation  

“It was a bright morning in Ayillo 2 camp in Uganda.  South Sudanese refugee children between 3-5 years were standing in a circle starting their daily routines in a Plan International supported space.  The day started with the morning circle where children came for a half day of play based learning activities. Halima and two other South Sudanese refugee caregivers led the children in songs and games about health, hygiene and topics that promoted literacy and numeracy.  Next came the game “news news”.  A little boy went to the centre of the circle to announce the day’s news.  Everyone clapped to applaud his efforts.

The number of humanitarian crises is increasing, they are lasting longer and more children are being displaced.  The Lancet’s new ECD series estimated that 250 million children (43%) younger than 5 years in low and middle-income countries are at risk not reaching their developmental potential.  Emergencies add to children’s existing adversities, making it even more difficult to flourish.  Prior to the war, Syria’s literacy rate was high and now after six years of war and displacement, that rate has significantly decreased.  Doing nothing to solve humanitarian crises will impact the next generation of workers in the global economy.”

Read the full blog post here.

Blog: Teachers for Teachers: Hope for refugee children  
By Mading Peter Angong, Teacher from Shambe Primary School, Kakuma Refugee Camp 

“Education is the only tool that gives back the lost dignity to refugee children. The thirst for education among the multinational refugee children in Kakuma Refugee Camp is insatiable. Effective education is only achieved through effective teachers, for great teachers create great students. In fact, an inspired and informed teacher is the most important factor influencing student achievements.  Nowhere in the world are such teachers needed more than in Kakuma Refugee Camp in Turkana County, north-eastern Kenya.

The unexpected appearance of Teachers for Teachers led by members from Teachers College, Columbia University (TC), the Lutheran World Federation (LWF), UNHCR and Finn Church Aid (FCA) brought a needed solution: training, mentoring and coaching of teachers. Led by Dr. Mary Mendenhall and her team, the program in the camp was set in motion. The writer of this article, one of the teachers in Kakuma, benefited immensely from this training.”

Read the full blog post here.

 

 

and wait for this:

Working Paper: Protecting the right to education for refugees
UNESCO 

This resource was included in the July 18 issue of INEE’s Bi-Weekly Bulletin. It is currently under revision. We look forward to sharing the revised copy as soon as it is complete. 

“This Working Paper aims to provide an overview of the international legal framework protecting the right to education of refugees worldwide, including the obligations of States, as well as the main current issues. It also shows that, despite the existence of a strong applicable framework to guarantee the right to education of refugees worldwide, the challenges and obstacles encountered in this context may dramatically prevent its enjoyment. The paper also emphasizes that, even though ensuring the right to education is fundamental in all phases of the situation, there is a particular need to draw attention to the stabilization phase.”

Stay tuned for the revised working paper.

 

 

Making the most of World Refugee Day

It’s World Refugee Day, a vital moment for raising awareness of the challenges refugees face every day around the world. Refugees have existed since notions of empire and state took root: people who have been forcibly displaced from their home, lacking rights, living under the fragile protection of a foreign ruler or government. The global […]

via Making the most of World Refugee Day — World Education Blog

I don’t think we need to take refugees as such a special case -many of our schools lack the inclusivity to welcome many of its potential clients.

We need to rebuild education from the base -attitudes need to change, whether they are towards, girls, children with disabilities, those starting without the national language, refugees etc.

Many children feel excluded whether they are in or out of school. Refugees have multiple barriers to their learning but we should use all of our experience of uses of technology,community learning spaces and accelerated learning to support all excluded children many of which may well be refugees.

Why the UK has to take some responsibility for refugees fleeing from conflict zones…

The UK government seems to be hesitant in decision making concenring the present ‘refugee’ crisis as if it should be someone else’s responsibility. It may be worth exploring the link between Britain’s involvement in arms manufacture and selling  and the results of conflict that are partly fuelled by the manufacture and trade in arms.

World’s largest arms exporters

The units in this table are so-called trend indicator values expressed in millions of U.S. dollars at 1990s prices. These values do not represent real financial flows but are a crude instrument to estimate volumes of arms transfers, regardless of the contracted prices, which can be as low as zero in the case of military aid. Ordered by descending 2014 values. The information is from theStockholm International Peace Research Institute.[12]

2014 rank Supplier Arms exports
1  United States 10194
2  Russia 5971
3  China 1978
4  France 1200
5  Germany 1110
6  United Kingdom 1083
7  Israel 1074
8  Spain 824
9  Italy 786
10  Ukraine 664
11  Netherlands 561
12  Sweden 394
13   Switzerland 350
14  Turkey 274
15  Canada 234

Perhaps we can compare the profits made by companies who are promoting conflict by producing and selling arms to the state of education in the countries that suffer from conflict:

From the world education blog

$2.3 billion needed to send all children and adolescents to school in war zones

This blog details the contents of a new paper by the Education for All Global Monitoring Report on the barriers that conflict poses to getting all children and adolescents into school, and a new suggested target for financing education in humanitarian crises.

Click to enlarge

Our new paper, released today, one week before the Oslo Summit on Education for Development, shows that 34 million children and adolescents are out of school in war zones.  The paper shows that $2.3 billion is required to place them in school – ten times the amount that education is receiving from humanitarian aid right now.

One of the core reasons conflict is taking such a heavy toll on education is lack of financing. In 2014, education received only two per cent of humanitarian aid.

The paper determines that even the suggested target of at least 4%, championed since 2011, is grossly insufficient. Had this target been met in 2013, it would have left 15.5 million children and youth without any humanitarian assistance in education. In 2013, 4% of humanitarian aid would have left over 4 million children and youth in Afghanistan, nearly 1.6 million children and youth in Syria, and almost 3 million in Sudan without humanitarian support.

It may be reasonable to levy a higher proportion of a company’s profits who benefit from conflict so as to pay for the results of such conflicts – this has been promoted in environmental circles as ‘polluter pays’.

So there should be a link between those who promote conflict by providing arms and the impact on communities, families and children in particular.

The present ‘ refugee crisis’ should be more broadly discussed rather than narrow mindedly pinpointing the refugees as being the ’cause’ of the crisis.

A Framework for the Protection of Children

A Framework for the Protection of Children

Before building new weapon systems perhaps we governments could spend a few moments considering how to protect some of the most vulnerable within our populations -the children.

(UNHCR)

The Framework applies a child protection systems approach that includes actions for duty bearers at all levels – family, community, national and international – to mitigate and respond to the protection risks children are facing. This recognizes that all actors contribute to the comprehensive protection of children.
The Framework was developed by UNHCR, in consultation with States, partners, communities and children themselves: more than 300 refugee girls and boys of different ages and abilities in Kenya, Nepal, India and Jordan shared their thoughts and ideas on protection risks and solutions.

 

The full report is available  here.

Opportunities for the Future: Basic vocational training for refugee youth in Dadaab (Kenya)

Worldwide , youth are having a difficult time, particularly in terms of low educational achievement and restricted job and training opportunities.

Those who are displaced or find themselves as refugees have particular difficulties:

Opportunities for the Future: Basic vocational training for refugee youth in Dadaab (Kenya)

Norwegian Refugee Council

Refugee youth in Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya consider lack of opportunities to be one of the biggest challenges to living in the camp.  Education proves to be a key factor in expanding opportunities within the limitations camp life sets. Yet little humanitarian assistance addresses  the specific learning needs of youth. How can education best address the needs of displaced youth with no educational background?

 

For more information, click here.