Curriculum Development – new Training Tools

Most countries are still trying to grapple with implementing an inclusive education policy, this pack provides tools to  develop a better understanding between the theory and practice of inclusion.

Training Tools for Curriculum Development
International Bureau of Education 

Resource Pack
The IBE series of Training Tools for Curriculum Development: a Resource Pack is designed to support Member States with regard to education and curriculum reforms and development processes. Drawing on international research evidence on ways to promote inclusion and foster greater fairness, it is intended to influence and support inclusive thinking and practices at all levels of an education system.

Specifically, ‘Reaching Out to All Learners: a Resource Pack for Supporting Inclusive Education’ intends to share this broader understanding of the theory and practice of inclusive education to support its effective implementation at the school and classroom levels.

It provides comprehensive guidance for national policy makers, curriculum specialists and developers, teachers, teacher educators, school leaders and district level administrators.

Click here to download the resource pack.

Sustainable Development – a resource bank

This blog tries to reach out and find suitable education resources,  so here is another opportunity to discover new resources by using the new UNESCO Clearinghouse on Education for Sustainable Development.

Clearinghouse and Resource Bank on Education for Sustainable Development  
UNESCO 

Clearinghouse and Resource Bank 

UNESCO has just released a Clearinghouse on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), containing important information, news, events, good practices and links around the Global Action Programme on ESD (GAP). It aims to serve as an online platform to share knowledge, experiences and competences of the ESD global community of practice.
The Clearinghouse comes with a comprehensive Resource Bank, gathering hundreds of ESD publications, videos, photos and other documents from all over the world. With an interface in English, French and Spanish, it is designed to help create synergies and cross-cutting collaboration through access to a wide selection of resources.

Click here to access the Clearinghouse.

Click here to access the Resource Bank.

IIEP – a new Learning Portal

There are plenty of opportunities to access learning material, but sometimes it takes too long to trawl through a range of disconnected sites. The new IIEP Learning Portal is worth a visit if you are an education planner and decision maker or an education practitioner -particular with an eye on the quality of education.

IIEP Learning Portal
IIEP

We are pleased to announce the launch of the IIEP Learning Portal, an interactive platform designed to help decision-makers and education practitioners plan for quality education and improved learning outcomes in the post-2015 era.

The IIEP Learning Portal responds to the needs of education planners, policy-makers, civil society actors, and funders throughout the world, by offering:

  • Brief summaries of the research on 25 ways to improve learning,
  • An overview of each step involved in creating a plan for learning improvement,
  • Tools and approaches to monitor learning and put the data to use,
  • A weekly blog and a daily selection of news articles on learning from around the world,
  • Ways to learn about major controversies and participate in e-Forum discussions,
  • glossary of key terms and a chance to ask a librarian to help you find the resources   you need,
  • More than 1,000 resources in a searchable database including research and reports on efforts to improve learning, sample policies, current debates and a wide range of experiences on learningissues.

We invite you to visit the new portal – http://learningportal.iiep.unesco.org/ – join the community (subscribe to our newsletter and connect on Twitter and Facebook) and discover how you can participate and benefit from its many resources on educational planning for improved learning.

Questions? Contact.learning@iiep.unesco.org

Girls’ education

During the last few years I have been working on aspects of Girls’ education in Zambia and Tanzania. We know the importance of a focus of attention on girls education for the future of any country so as to overcome discrimination and to enhance  human potential of the whole nation.

Why a focus on girls?

Two-thirds of the world’s uneducated children are girls, and two-thirds of the world’s illiterate adults are women. Around the world, girls and women continue to suffer from a lack of economic opportunity, inadequate health care and education, early marriage, sexual violence, and discrimination.

Numerous studies have demonstrated that educating women and girls is the single most effective strategy to ensure the well-being and health of children, and the long-term success of developing economies.

There are many benefits associated with girls’ education, such as:

Reduction of child and maternal mortality

Improvement of child nutrition and health

Lower birth rates

Enhancement of women’s domestic role and their political participation.

In education, a focus on the quality of education of girls ensures an improvement in the quality of education for all students.

Some new posts from the INEE newsletter:

Community-Supported Models for Girls’ Education in Diverse Contexts in Pakistan

Brookings.

Paper
This paper presents the case for promoting girls’ education in the challenging contexts of remoteness, social conservatism, fragility, and severe financial hardship by providing localized services delivered through community-supported initiatives, contextualized approaches, and flexible strategies. This argument draws from the latest literature on community-supported education, barriers to girls’ education, and the role of nongovernmental actors, as well as the author’s research on three community-supported schooling models in three different contexts in Pakistan: 1) in a state of fragility; 2) in a socially conservative area experiencing social resistance to girls’ education; and 3) in an urban slum area.

 

WASH in Schools for Girls E-Course 
UNICEF, UNGEI, Emory University, Govt. Of Canada

Publication 
The WinS4Girls E-Course was developed and delivered as part of the project ‘WASH in Schools for Girls: Advocacy and Capacity Building for MHM through WASH in Schools Programmes’ (WinS4Girls Project), which is being funded by the Government of Canada. In recognition of the positive impact on girls’ education, initiatives around the world are addressing adolescent girls’ menstrual hygiene management (MHM) needs in coordination with ongoing efforts to improve water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities and services in schools. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization often associated with menstruation, integrating MHM into WASH in Schools (WinS) empowers all students, especially girls.

Click here to download the publication.