International Day of the Girl Child 2017

Again we need more than a day -but for raising awareness that leads to action, it is still worth celebrating:

Check out UBONGO kids from Tanzania:

While women currently make up over 50% of the labour force in Africa, they have very little control over the capital and resources on the continent. Moreover, in places like Tanzania, a higher percentage of girls complete primary school education than boys, but less of them graduate from high school and go on to receive a university degree. It is clear that there is a disparity between the capabilities of women and girls, and the opportunities afforded to them by society.

Recently, Ubongo’s research team went out to Lake Nakuru (Kenya), Mwanza and Shinyanga (both in Tanzania), to speak to adolescent girls (aged 10-14) and their parents about their ambitions and challenges in life. We were especially interested in learning about girls’ knowledge and perception of money, in order to deduce what skills they needed to learn to improve their financial literacy and gain better control over their resources. This ongoing project was undertaken in collaboration with SPRING, an organization that works with innovative companies which help transform the lives of adolescent girls living in East Africa and South Asia.

Today, as people across the world celebrate girls and address the key challenges to their development, we’d like to share with you five things we learned from the girls we met in Tanzania and Kenya.

Here are 5 things we learned:

  1. All the girls we spoke to expressed their ambition of achieving professional careers such as being; doctors, lawyers, pilots and that education was the key to achieving these ambitions

  2. Girls identified with female role models such as; their mother, aunt, local politicians and described their role models as hardworking, caring and ambitious

  3. Girls were in agreement that items they “want” rather than “need” should be purchased through their own savings

  4. Girls still desired the involvement of parents in financial decision making and parents cited the need for additional support in educating their daughters about financial literacy

  5. Parents desire girls to learn basic business concepts that involve allocation of capital expenses and reinvesting in diverse business ventures

With this information, we plan to create new episodes of Ubongo Kids that teach kids, and girls in particular, about saving, earning and budgeting. Moreover, we hope to be able to share this content with the millions of girls in emergency and crisis situations through our Ubongo Learn Anywhere Kits.

There is a lot more that we are planning, and we thank you for all the support you’ve shown us and the millions of girls across Africa that we reach through our content.

In the meantime, watch this inspiring song that we created especially for today to celebrate just how amazing girls are!

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100 languages

 

100 languages of children – the Emilio Reggio Approach to teaching and learning.

One of the key principles of the Reggio Emilia approach is the belief and use of 100 hundred languages. The principle refers to communication, the emphasis is on offering children one hundred ways to share their thinking.  Children learn in different ways and the one hundred languages offer different means for learning and expression (e.g. talking, writing, drawing, painting, wire sculpture, clay modeling, dancing, acting, representing with recyclable, manmade materials or natural materials).

100languages Emilio

 

 

Young children need to be free to express – later they may not get the chance 🙂

Let teachers teach…..

Today, on World Teachers’ Day, we look at one of the findings in the 2017/8 GEM Report on accountability in education due out later this month. The Report celebrates the undeniably critical role that teachers play in any education system: they hold the primary responsibility for educating the students in their care. In recent years, […]

via Let teachers teach: The dangers of expanding teacher workloads — World Education Blog