The Best Start in Life….great free online course

For anyone wanting to update their practical knowledge on early childhood development -they really should follow this course. It is completely free and you can gain a certificate on completion.

The Best Start in Life: Early Childhood Development for Sustainable Development
SDG AcademyChildren are the common basis for all dimensions of sustainable development. No advances in sustainable development will occur in coming decades without multiple generations contributing to societal improvement. Moreover, beyond sheer survival, children have a right to thrive, develop to their full potential, and live in a sustainable world.

This course draws from research in neuroscience, psychology, economics, anthropology and program implementation and evaluation in order to discuss Early Childhood Development and explore its role in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

If you have any additional questions on the course structure or requirements, please email the SDG Academy at sdgacademy@unsdsn.org. For technical questions about the platform, please email support@edcast.com.

For more information on this course click here.

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Nurturing care for early childhood development

I am not sure how long it will take before governments take the importance of ECD more seriously but there are a number of initiatives,that can help:

[FRAMEWORK] Nurturing care for early childhood development
WHO, UNICEF, World Bank Group

The Nurturing Care Framework was created in response to strong evidence and growing recognition that the early years are critical for human development. It sets out the most effective policies and services that will help parents and caregivers provide nurturing care for babies. To reach their full potential, children need the five inter-related and indivisible components of nurturing care: good health, adequate nutrition, safety and security, responsive caregiving and opportunities for learning.Investing in early childhood development is one of the best investments a country can make to boost economic growth, promote peaceful and sustainable societies, and eliminate extreme poverty and inequality. Equally important, investing in early childhood development is necessary to uphold the right of every child to survive and thrive. The Framework provides an evidence-based road map for acton and outlines how policies and services can support parents, families, other caregivers and communities in providing nurturing care for young children. It calls for attention to be paid to communities where children are most at risk of being left behind.

The Nurturing Care Framework is designed to mobilise a coalition of parents and caregivers, national governments, civil society groups, academics, the United Nations, the private sector, educational institutions and service providers to ensure every baby gets the best start in life.

Click here to download.

Tracking of aid to early childhood development needs to improve

All the evidence is there -in fact we have known about the importance of ECD for future lives for decades and now we have the neuroscience to support this. So why does health and nutrition,rather than the whole child be the focus of attention of donors -is it because it is easier?

This blog was written by Asma Zubairi, a researcher at REAL Centre at the University of Cambridge. How much do donors spend on early childhood development? This is the key question for our new report for Theirworld Just beginning: Addressing inequality in donor funding for Early Childhood Development. Early Childhood Development (ECD) is widely recognised […]

via Tracking of aid to early childhood development needs to improve — World Education Blog

100 languages

 

100 languages of children – the Emilio Reggio Approach to teaching and learning.

One of the key principles of the Reggio Emilia approach is the belief and use of 100 hundred languages. The principle refers to communication, the emphasis is on offering children one hundred ways to share their thinking.  Children learn in different ways and the one hundred languages offer different means for learning and expression (e.g. talking, writing, drawing, painting, wire sculpture, clay modeling, dancing, acting, representing with recyclable, manmade materials or natural materials).

100languages Emilio

 

 

Young children need to be free to express – later they may not get the chance 🙂

The best start in life -how to reach the SDGs.

I have just completed a great MOOC! The online course was called “The Best Start in Life: Early Childhood Development for Sustainable Development” This is the newest course from the UN Sustainable Development Network’s Online Education Initiative – the SDG Academy.

Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Co-Director of the NYU Global TIES for Children Center, was the primary faculty member teaching the course; others were Prof. Catherine Tamis-LeMonda of NYU Steinhardt Applied Psychology, Jack Shonkoff, MD (Director, Harvard Center on the Developing Child) and Prof. Aisha Yousafzai (Harvard Chan School of Public Health).  Dr. Pia Britto, Chief of Early Childhood Development for UNICEF was featured in the last week’s final module.

Many people from all over the globe participated and the feedback was very positive.

 

The syllabus was comprehensive:

Hirokazu Yoshikawa and Jack Shonkoff

1.1       Early Childhood Development for Sustainable Development

1.2       The State of the World’s Children

1.3       How Brain Architecture Develops

1.4       The Impact of Adversity & Toxic Stress

1.5       Resilience & How to Foster It

 

 Child Development: Prenatal to Age 3

Catherine Tamis-LeMonda

2.1       Development in Culture & Context

2.2       Physical Development

2.3       Cognitive Development and Perception

2.4       Language Development

2.5       Social Development

2.6       Emotional Development &Temperament

 Child Development: Ages 3 to 8

Hirokazu Yoshikawa

3.1       Physical Development

3.2       Cognitive Development & Executive Function

3.3       Language

3.4       Socio-emotional Development

 Tour of ECD Sectors & Programs Part I

Aisha Yousafzai

4.1       Introduction to Multi-sector Aspects

4.2       Health Programs

4.3       Nutrition & Parenting Programs

 

Tour of ECD Sectors & Programs Part 2

Hirokazu Yoshikawa

5.1       Social Protection Programs

5.2       Early Care & Education Programs

5.3       Child Protection Programs

 

Communities & Conflict Situations

Hirokazu Yoshikawa

6.1       Uganda Case Study

6.2       Community Based Programs

6.3       Conflict & Migration

 

From Programs to Policies

Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Human Capital Summit: Investing in the Early Years for Growth and Productivity

 

Investing in the early years is one of the smartest investments a country can make to break the cycle of poverty, address inequality, and boost productivity later in life. Today, millions of young children are not reaching their full potential because of inadequate nutrition, lack of early stimulation and learning, and exposure to stress. Investments in the physical, mental, and emotional development of children — from before birth until they enter primary school – are critical for the future productivity of individuals and for the economic competitiveness of nations. Country leaders need to  make commitments to reduce chronic malnutrition in children and expand access to early childhood development services by 2020 to ensure that children everywhere can thrive.

Even this is too late -something can happen now, as a 5 year old child  is only 5 once, so 2020 is still too late.

It took just 5 months to establish a 12 week school readiness programme in 7 regions in Tanzania – developing a curriculum, writing and illustrating 12 story books, training 1000 volunteer Community Teaching Assistants, engaging communities and preparing more than 50,000 children to start primary school, where they could not access previously. In January 2016 a sample of children were assessed and achieved equally or more than children who had one year of pre-primary school and very much higher than those who had no access to pre-primary classes. They are now progressing well.

So why wait? We can make a start now!